Current HIV/AIDS Reports

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 20–26

Regulatory T cells in HIV infection: Who’s suppressing what?

Authors

    • Centre for ImmunologySt Vincent’s Hospital
  • Anthony D. Kelleher
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11904-008-0004-6

Cite this article as:
Seddiki, N. & Kelleher, A.D. Curr HIV/AIDS Rep (2008) 5: 20. doi:10.1007/s11904-008-0004-6

Abstract

The role of regulatory T cells (Treg) in HIV pathogenesis is not fully elucidated. Persistent antigens, such as HIV, are believed to promote the expansion and activation of antigen-specific Treg, and several reports have described beneficial and detrimental roles for Treg in HIV pathogenesis. These apparently contradictory observations may arise from imprecision in enumerating Treg and the lack of definition of Treg subsets. New markers allowing more precise identification and purification of Treg for functional studies have been described recently, and these may open avenues for efficient isolation of pure, homogenous populations of human Treg.

Copyright information

© Current Medicine Group LLC 2008