Hepatitis B: Epidemiology, Natural History, Treatment, and Transplantation (Thomas Berg and Steven-Huy Han, Section Editors)

Current Hepatitis Reports

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 262-268

First online:

Management of Hepatitis B Virus Coinfection: HIV, Hepatitis C Virus, Hepatitis D Virus

  • Kalyan Ram BhamidimarriAffiliated withDivision of Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, The Mount Sinai Medical Center
  • , James ParkAffiliated withDivision of Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, The Mount Sinai Medical Center
  • , Douglas DieterichAffiliated withDivision of Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, The Mount Sinai Medical Center Email author 

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Abstract

Coinfection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) is common because of shared modes of transmission. Increasing prevalence of high risk sexual behavior and intra venous drug use (IVDU) contributes to a majority of the cases with coinfection. Occult HBV or prior HBV infection is frequently encountered in patients coinfected with HIV or HCV. Although HBV is a preventable disease, failure to screen and inadequate vaccination in the high risk individuals account for vast under-recognition of the cases with HBV infection. Chronic liver disease from viral hepatitis B and C has emerged as the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide as well as in the United States. This is especially true in cases coinfected with HIV. The potential long term risks of untreated hepatitis include cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. There have been several advancements in the understanding of natural history and management options of chronic viral hepatitis. This article discusses and reviews the natural history, epidemiology, and management of HBV patients coinfected with HIV, HCV, or HDV. It includes an updated summary of the outcomes with liver transplantation and post transplant recurrence in the coinfected population with HBV. It also discusses the role of occult HBV in HIV and HCV coinfection respectively.

Keywords

Hepatitis B virus Chronic hepatitis Coinfection Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis D HIV