Journal of Cancer Survivorship

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 425–438

Assessment of the status of A National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship in the USA

  • Judith Lee Smith
  • Lori A. Pollack
  • Juan L. Rodriguez
  • Nikki A. Hawkins
  • Tenbroeck Smith
  • Ruth Rechis
  • Andy Miller
  • Anne Willis
  • Helen Miller
  • Ingrid J. Hall
  • Temeika L. Fairley
  • Brenda Stone-Wiggins
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11764-013-0276-8

Cite this article as:
Smith, J.L., Pollack, L.A., Rodriguez, J.L. et al. J Cancer Surviv (2013) 7: 425. doi:10.1007/s11764-013-0276-8

Abstract

Purpose

There are currently more than 12 million cancer survivors in the USA. Survivors face many issues related to cancer and treatment that are outside the purview of the clinical care system. Therefore, understanding and providing for the evolving needs of cancer survivors offers challenges and opportunities for the public health system. In 2004, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Lance Armstrong Foundation, now the Livestrong Foundation, partnered with national cancer survivorship organizations to develop the National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship (NAPCS). This plan outlines public health strategies to address the needs of cancer survivors. To date, no assessment of NAPCS strategies and their alignment with domestic cancer survivorship activities has been conducted.

Methods

The activities of five national organizations with organized public health agendas about cancer survivorship were assessed qualitatively during 2003–2007. Using the NAPCS as an organizing framework, interviews were conducted with key informants from all participating organizations. Interview responses were supplemented with relevant materials from informants and reviews of the organizations’ websites.

Results

Strategies associated with surveillance and applied research; communication, education, and training; and programs, policy, and infrastructure represent a large amount of the organizational efforts. However, there are gaps in research on preventive interventions, evaluation of implemented activities, and translation.

Conclusions

Numerous NAPCS strategies have been implemented. Future efforts of national cancer survivorship organizations should include rigorous evaluation of implemented activities, increased translation of research to practice, and assessment of dissemination efforts.

Implications for Cancer Survivors

The results of this descriptive assessment provide cancer survivors, cancer survivorship organizations, researchers, providers, and policy makers with initial information about cancer survivorship public health efforts in the USA. Additionally, results suggest areas in need of further attention and next steps in advancing the national cancer survivorship public health agenda.

Keywords

Cancer survivorship National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship Public health Assessment Evaluation 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA)  2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith Lee Smith
    • 1
  • Lori A. Pollack
    • 1
    • 7
  • Juan L. Rodriguez
    • 1
  • Nikki A. Hawkins
    • 1
  • Tenbroeck Smith
    • 2
  • Ruth Rechis
    • 3
  • Andy Miller
    • 3
  • Anne Willis
    • 4
  • Helen Miller
    • 5
  • Ingrid J. Hall
    • 1
  • Temeika L. Fairley
    • 1
  • Brenda Stone-Wiggins
    • 6
  1. 1.Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Behavioral Research Center, Intramural Research Department, American Cancer SocietyAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.Livestrong FoundationAustinUSA
  4. 4.National Coalition for Cancer SurvivorshipSilver SpringUSA
  5. 5.CancerCareNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.RTI InternationalResearch Triangle ParkUSA
  7. 7.Prevention and Response Branch, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA

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