Lipids

, Volume 36, Issue 9, pp 1025–1032

Polyunsaturated fatty acids and T-cell function: Implications for the neonate

Authors

    • Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional ScienceUniversity of Alberta
    • Department MedicineUniversity of Alberta
  • M. Thomas Clandinin
    • Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional ScienceUniversity of Alberta
    • Department MedicineUniversity of Alberta
  • John E. Van Aerde
    • PediatricsUniversity of Alberta
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11745-001-0813-6

Cite this article as:
Field, C.J., Clandinin, M.T. & Van Aerde, J.E. Lipids (2001) 36: 1025. doi:10.1007/s11745-001-0813-6

Abstract

Infant survival depends on the ability to respond effectively and appropriately to environmental challenges. Infants are born with a degree of immunological immaturity that renders them susceptible to infection and abnormal dietary responses (allergies). T-lymphocyte function is poorly developed at birth. The reduced ability of infants to respond to mitogens may be the result, of the low number of CD45RO+ (memory/antigen-primed). T cells in the infant or the limited ability to produce cytokines [particularly interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-10]. There have been many important changes in optimizing breast milk substitutes for infants; however, few have been directed at replacing factors in breast milk that convey immune benefits. Recent research has been directed at the neurological, retinal, and membrane benefits of adding 20∶4n−6 (arachidonic acid; AA) and 22∶6n−3 (docosahexaenoic acid; DHA) to infant formula. In addults and animals, feeding DHA affects T-cell function. However, the effect of these lipids on the development and function of the infant's immune system is not known. We recently reported the effect of adding DHA+AA to a standard infant formula on several functional indices of immune development. Compared with standard formula, feeding a formula containing DHA+AA increased the proporition of antigen mature (CD45RO+) CD4+ cells, improved IL-10 production, and reduced IL-2 production to levels not different from those of human milk-fed infants. This review will briefly describe T-cell development and the potential immune effect of feeding long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids to the neonate.

Abbreviations

AA

arachidonic acid

DHA

docosahe xaenoic acid

EPA

eicosapentaenoic acid

IFN

interferon

IL

interleukin

MHC

major histocompatibility complex

NK

natural killer

PHA

phytohemagglutinin

PUFA

polyunsaturated fatty acids

sIL-2R

secretory IL-2 receptor

Th

helper T cells

Copyright information

© AOCS Press 2001