Internal and Emergency Medicine

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 535–543

Evaluation of internet-based patient education materials from internal medicine subspecialty organizations: will patients understand them?

  • David R. Hansberry
  • Nitin Agarwal
  • Elizabeth S. John
  • Ann M. John
  • Prateek Agarwal
  • James C. Reynolds
  • Stephen R. Baker
CE - ORIGINAL

DOI: 10.1007/s11739-017-1611-2

Cite this article as:
Hansberry, D.R., Agarwal, N., John, E.S. et al. Intern Emerg Med (2017) 12: 535. doi:10.1007/s11739-017-1611-2

Abstract

The majority of Americans use the Internet daily, if not more often, and many search online for health information to better understand a diagnosis they have been given or to research treatment options. The average American reads at an eighth-grade level. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the readability of online patient education materials on the websites of 14 professional organizations representing the major internal medicine subspecialties. We used ten well-established quantitative readability scales to assess written text from patient education materials published on the websites of the major professional organizations representing the following subspecialty groups: allergy and immunology, cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, geriatrics, hematology, hospice and palliative care, infectious disease, nephrology, oncology, pulmonology and critical care, rheumatology, sleep medicine, and sports medicine. Collectively the 540 articles analyzed were written at an 11th-grade level (SD 1.4 grade levels). The sleep medicine and nephrology websites had the most readable materials, written at an academic grade level of 8.5 ± 1.5 and 9.0 ± 0.2, respectively. Material at the infectious disease site was written at the most difficult level, with average readability corresponding to grades 13.9 ± 0.3. None of the patient education materials we reviewed conformed to the American Medical Association (AMA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines requiring that patient education articles be written at a third- to seventh-grade reading level. If these online resources were rewritten, it is likely that more patients would derive benefit from reading them.

Keywords

Internal medicine Internet Literacy Patient education Readability 

Copyright information

© SIMI 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • David R. Hansberry
    • 1
  • Nitin Agarwal
    • 2
  • Elizabeth S. John
    • 3
  • Ann M. John
    • 4
  • Prateek Agarwal
    • 5
  • James C. Reynolds
    • 6
  • Stephen R. Baker
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyThomas Jefferson University HospitalsPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Neurological SurgeryUniversity of Pittsburgh Medical CenterPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineUniversity of Central Florida College of MedicineOrlandoUSA
  4. 4.Department of Medicine, New Jersey Medical School, RutgersThe State University of New JerseyNewarkUSA
  5. 5.Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  6. 6.Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  7. 7.Department of Radiology, New Jersey Medical School, RutgersThe State University of New JerseyNewarkUSA

Personalised recommendations