Obesity Surgery

, Volume 24, Issue 10, pp 1709–1716

Baseline Abdominal Lipid Partitioning Is Associated with the Metabolic Response to Bariatric Surgery

  • Andrei Keidar
  • Liat Appelbaum
  • Chaya Schweiger
  • Karen Hershkop
  • Idit Matot
  • Naama Constantini
  • Jacob Sosna
  • Ram Weiss
Original Contributions

DOI: 10.1007/s11695-014-1249-3

Cite this article as:
Keidar, A., Appelbaum, L., Schweiger, C. et al. OBES SURG (2014) 24: 1709. doi:10.1007/s11695-014-1249-3

Abstract

Background

The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two bariatric procedures on abdominal lipid partitioning and metabolic response.

Methods

Fifty-one patients (RYGB 31(11 M/20 F); (SG) 20(8 M/12 F)) who met the criteria of metabolic syndrome before the operation were followed following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat depots were assessed by CT before, 6 months, and 12 months following the operation.

Results

Patients undergoing both procedures did not differ in baseline body mass index (BMI) (42.84 ± 4.65 vs. 41.70 ± 4.68 kg/m2) or abdominal lipid depots. BMI at 12 months post-op was similar (29.44 ± 3.35 vs 30.86 ± 4.31 kg/m2 for RYGB and SG, respectively). Both procedures led to a significant reduction in visceral and subcutaneous fat at 6 months (p < 0.001 for both). The visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio was comparable at 6 months vs. baseline yet was lower at 12 months vs. baseline for both procedures (p < 0.01). In patients who lost the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, baseline visceral/subcutaneous fat was the only predictor of recovery (p < 0.005). No difference was detected between procedures in dynamics of abdominal fat depots or remission of cardiovascular risk factors.

Conclusions

RYGB and SG induce a similar effect on abdominal fat mobilization. The metabolic effects in individual patients are mostly determined by their baseline abdominal lipid partitioning.

Keywords

Bariatric surgeryVisceral fatSubcutaneous fatMetabolic syndrome

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrei Keidar
    • 3
    • 6
  • Liat Appelbaum
    • 2
  • Chaya Schweiger
    • 3
  • Karen Hershkop
    • 1
  • Idit Matot
    • 4
  • Naama Constantini
    • 5
  • Jacob Sosna
    • 2
  • Ram Weiss
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Human Metabolism and NutritionHebrew University School of MedicineJerusalemIsrael
  2. 2.Radiology DepartmentHadassah Ein Kerem Medical CenterJerusalemIsrael
  3. 3.Bariatric Surgery Service, Department of SurgeryRabin HospitalPetach TiqkvaIsrael
  4. 4.Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care MedicineSourasky Medical Center affiliated with the Tel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  5. 5.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryThe Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical CenterJerusalemIsrael
  6. 6.General Surgery DepartmentHadassah Ein Kerem Medical CenterJerusalemIsrael