Obesity Surgery

, Volume 21, Issue 6, pp 811–814

Objective Assessment of Time Spent Being Sedentary in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

  • Dale S. Bond
  • Jessica L. Unick
  • John M. Jakicic
  • Sivamainthan Vithiananthan
  • Dieter Pohl
  • G. Dean Roye
  • Beth A. Ryder
  • Harry C. Sax
  • Jeannine Giovanni
  • Rena R. Wing
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s11695-010-0151-x

Cite this article as:
Bond, D.S., Unick, J.L., Jakicic, J.M. et al. OBES SURG (2011) 21: 811. doi:10.1007/s11695-010-0151-x

Abstract

Background

Bariatric surgery candidates spend very little time in moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (≥3 metabolic equivalents [METs]). This study examined (1) how much of their remaining time is spent in sedentary behaviors (SB < 1.5 METs) compared to light-intensity activities (1.5–2.9 METs) and (2) whether sedentary time varies by BMI.

Methods

Daily time (hours, %) spent in SB was examined in 42 surgery candidates (BMI = 49.5 ± 7.9 kg/m2) using the SenseWear Pro2 Armband. Participants were stratified by BMI to assess the relationship between degree of obesity and SB.

Results

Participants wore the armband for 5.4 ± 0.7 days and 13.3 ± 1.7 h/day. On average, 81.4% (10.9 ± 2.1 h/day) of this time was spent in SB. Participants with BMI ≥ 50 spent nearly an hour more per day in SB than those with BMI 35–49.9 (p = 0.01).

Conclusions

Bariatric surgery candidates spend over 80% of their time in SB. Reducing SB may help to increase physical activity in these patients.

Keywords

Sedentary behaviorPhysical activityBariatric surgeryObesitySenseWear Pro2 Armband

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dale S. Bond
    • 1
  • Jessica L. Unick
    • 1
  • John M. Jakicic
    • 2
  • Sivamainthan Vithiananthan
    • 3
  • Dieter Pohl
    • 4
  • G. Dean Roye
    • 5
  • Beth A. Ryder
    • 5
  • Harry C. Sax
    • 3
  • Jeannine Giovanni
    • 4
  • Rena R. Wing
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviorWarren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, The Miriam Hospital/Weight Control and Diabetes Research CenterProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Department of Health and Physical ActivityUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Department of SurgeryWarren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, The Miriam HospitalProvidenceUSA
  4. 4.Department of SurgeryRoger Williams HospitalProvidenceUSA
  5. 5.Department of SurgeryWarren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Rhode Island HospitalProvidenceUSA