Obesity Surgery

, Volume 18, Issue 10, pp 1241–1245

The Impact of Medicaid Status on Outcome After Gastric Bypass

  • J. Wesley Alexander
  • Hope R. Goodman
  • Lisa R. Martin Hawver
  • Laura James
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11695-008-9615-7

Cite this article as:
Alexander, J.W., Goodman, H.R., Hawver, L.R.M. et al. OBES SURG (2008) 18: 1241. doi:10.1007/s11695-008-9615-7

Abstract

Background

Socioeconomic status has been a predictor of poor outcome in many surgical diseases including morbid obesity. Potential differences in treatment and initial severity of disease have often not been well controlled in patients with bariatric surgery. This study was performed to compare the results of bariatric procedures in financially disadvantaged Medicaid patients compared to patients with Medicare and those with Commercial insurance under controlled conditions.

Methods

Prospectively collected data from 183 Medicaid, 77 Medicare and 570 Commercial/self-pay insurances were compared to determine the influence of poor economic status on outcome. All the patients received surgical care by the same surgeon at a large University-affiliated private hospital.

Results

Medicaid patients were larger (BMI 58.4 vs. 52.8 and 50.9, respectively) and had a greater incidence of serious comorbid conditions at outset. The death rate and complications were also significantly higher postoperatively in Medicaid patients. However, when the patients were matched for age and BMI, results became similar.

Conclusion

Increases in postoperative mortality and morbidity appear to be associated with advanced disease because of poor access to care. When matched for age, BMI, and severity of disease, outcomes are similar. Changes in Medicaid policies could improve access and outcome.

Keywords

Morbid obesityGastric bypassMedicaidSocioeconomically disadvantaged

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Wesley Alexander
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hope R. Goodman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Lisa R. Martin Hawver
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Laura James
    • 3
  1. 1.Center for Surgical Weight Loss, Department of SurgeryUniversity of Cincinnati College of MedicineCincinnatiUSA
  2. 2.Weight Loss ServiceThe Christ HospitalCincinnatiUSA
  3. 3.Department of SurgeryUniversity of Cincinnati College of MedicineCincinnatiUSA