Brain Imaging and Behavior

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 501–510

Elevated prefrontal myo-inositol and choline following breast cancer chemotherapy

  • Shelli R. Kesler
  • Christa Watson
  • Della Koovakkattu
  • Clement Lee
  • Ruth O’Hara
  • Misty L. Mahaffey
  • Jeffrey S. Wefel
SI: Neuroimaging Studies of Cancer and Cancer Treatment

DOI: 10.1007/s11682-013-9228-1

Cite this article as:
Kesler, S.R., Watson, C., Koovakkattu, D. et al. Brain Imaging and Behavior (2013) 7: 501. doi:10.1007/s11682-013-9228-1

Abstract

Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for cognitive dysfunction, which reduces quality of life. Neuroimaging studies provide critical insights regarding the mechanisms underlying these cognitive deficits as well as potential biologic targets for interventions. We measured several metabolite concentrations using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as cognitive performance in 19 female breast cancer survivors and 17 age-matched female controls. Women with breast cancer were all treated with chemotherapy. Results indicated significantly increased choline (Cho) and myo-inositol (mI) with correspondingly decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/Cho and NAA/mI ratios in the breast cancer group compared to controls. The breast cancer group reported reduced executive function and memory, and subjective memory ability was correlated with mI and Cho levels in both groups. These findings provide preliminary evidence of an altered metabolic profile that increases our understanding of neurobiologic status post-breast cancer and chemotherapy.

Keywords

MR Spectroscopy Breast Cancer Cognition Prefrontal Cortex Chemotherapy 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shelli R. Kesler
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christa Watson
    • 1
    • 3
  • Della Koovakkattu
    • 1
  • Clement Lee
    • 1
  • Ruth O’Hara
    • 1
  • Misty L. Mahaffey
    • 2
  • Jeffrey S. Wefel
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Stanford Cancer InstitutePalo AltoUSA
  3. 3.Memory and Aging Center, Department of NeurologyUniversity of California at San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.Department of Neuro-OncologyUniversity of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA