Brain Imaging and Behavior

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 528–539

Confirmatory factor analysis of the ADNI neuropsychological battery

Authors

    • Alzheimer’s Disease Center, UCDMC Department of NeurologyUniversity of California, Davis
  • Alden L. Gross
    • Institute for Aging Research, Harvard Medical School and Division of GerontologyBeth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  • Donald G. McLaren
    • Geriatric Research Education and Clinical CenterENRM Veterans Hospital
    • Department of NeurologyMassachusetts General Hospital
    • Harvard Medical School
    • Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging Department of RadiologyMassachusetts General Hospital
  • Judy Pa
    • Department of NeurologyUniversity of California, San Francisco
  • Julene K. Johnson
    • Department of NeurologyUniversity of California, San Francisco
    • Institute for Health and Aging, Department of Social and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of California, San Francisco
  • Meghan Mitchell
    • Geriatric Research Education and Clinical CenterENRM Veterans Hospital
    • Department of NeurologyMassachusetts General Hospital
    • Harvard Medical School
  • Jennifer J. Manly
    • Department of Neurology, Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging BrainColumbia University Medical Center
  • for the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative
ADNI: Friday Harbor 2011 Workshop SPECIAL ISSUE

DOI: 10.1007/s11682-012-9190-3

Cite this article as:
Park, L.Q., Gross, A.L., McLaren, D.G. et al. Brain Imaging and Behavior (2012) 6: 528. doi:10.1007/s11682-012-9190-3

Abstract

The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is a large multi-center study designed to develop optimized methods for acquiring longitudinal neuroimaging, cognitive, and biomarker measures of AD progression in a large cohort of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment, and healthy controls. Detailed neuropsychological testing was conducted on all participants. We examined the factor structure of the ADNI Neuropsychological Battery across older adults with differing levels of clinical AD severity based on the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of 23 variables from 10 neuropsychological tests resulted in five factors (memory, language, visuospatial functioning, attention, and executive function/processing speed) that were invariant across levels of cognitive impairment. Thus, these five factors can be used as indicators of cognitive function in older adults who are participants in ADNI.

Keywords

ADNI Neuropsychology Cognition Cognitive change Confirmatory factor analysis

Supplementary material

11682_2012_9190_MOESM1_ESM.docx (90 kb)
Supplemental Table S1 Correlation Matrix for Neuropsychological Tests by Group (n=819) (DOCX 90 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012