Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 81–88

Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Study of Texture Evolution in 904L Stainless Steel under Dynamic Shock Compression

  • N. Li
  • Y. D. Wang
  • R. Lin Peng
  • X. Sun
  • Y. Ren
  • L. Wang
  • H. N. Cai
Symposium: Diffraction Studies of Advanced Materials

DOI: 10.1007/s11661-010-0368-2

Cite this article as:
Li, N., Wang, Y.D., Lin Peng, R. et al. Metall and Mat Trans A (2011) 42: 81. doi:10.1007/s11661-010-0368-2

Abstract

The influence of strain rate on development of deformation texture under a dynamic shock compression of a 904L stainless steel was quantitatively investigated using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and crystallographic orientation distribution function (ODF) analysis. The Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique was used to generate a high strain rate of >103 s−1 for preparing the deformed samples. Starting with an almost random texture in a solution treatment condition, the deformed material developed several typical texture components, such as Goss texture and Brass texture. Compared to the texture components displayed in the state of quasi-static compression deformation, it was found that the high-speed deformation generated much weaker texture components. In combination with the change in microstructures observed by electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique, the high-energy X-ray diffraction provides a powerful tool for characterizing the strain-rate dependence of grain rotation at each stage of deformation. The deformation heterogeneity evident in our experiment can be explained by a transition of deformation mechanism from the dislocation/twin-dominated mode to a shear-band-dominated one with increasing strain rate.

Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Li
    • 1
  • Y. D. Wang
    • 1
  • R. Lin Peng
    • 2
  • X. Sun
    • 3
  • Y. Ren
    • 4
  • L. Wang
    • 1
  • H. N. Cai
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Materials Science and EngineeringBeijing Institute of TechnologyBeijingP.R. China
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringLinköping UniversityLinköpingSweden
  3. 3.Computational Science and Mathematics DivisionPacific Northwest National LaboratoryRichlandUSA
  4. 4.X-ray Science DivisionArgonne National LaboratoryArgonneUSA

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