In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Plant

, Volume 43, Issue 4, pp 283–303

Technological advances in temperate hardwood tree improvement including breeding and molecular marker applications

  • Paula M. Pijut
  • Keith E. Woeste
  • G. Vengadesan
  • Charles H. Michler
Invited Reviews

DOI: 10.1007/s11627-007-9026-9

Cite this article as:
Pijut, P.M., Woeste, K.E., Vengadesan, G. et al. In Vitro Cell.Dev.Biol.-Plant (2007) 43: 283. doi:10.1007/s11627-007-9026-9

Abstract

Hardwood forests and plantations are an important economic resource for the forest products industry worldwide and to the international trade of lumber and logs. Hardwood trees are also planted for ecological reasons, for example, wildlife habitat, native woodland restoration, and riparian buffers. The demand for quality hardwood from tree plantations will continue to rise as the worldwide consumption of forest products increases. Tree improvement of temperate hardwoods has lagged behind that of coniferous species and hardwoods of the genera Populus and Eucalyptus. The development of marker systems has become an almost necessary complement to the classical breeding and improvement of hardwood tree populations for superior growth, form, and timber characteristics. Molecular markers are especially valuable for determining the reproductive biology and population structure of natural forests and plantations, and the identity of genes affecting quantitative traits. Clonal reproduction of commercially important hardwood tree species provides improved planting stock for use in progeny testing and production forestry. Development of in vitro and conventional vegetative propagation methods allows mass production of clones of mature, elite genotypes or genetically improved genotypes. Genetic modification of hardwood tree species could potentially produce trees with herbicide tolerance, disease and pest resistance, improved wood quality, and reproductive manipulations for commercial plantations. This review concentrates on recent advances in conventional breeding and selection, molecular marker application, in vitro culture, and genetic transformation, and discusses the future challenges and opportunities for valuable temperate (or “fine”) hardwood tree improvement.

Keywords

Clonal propagationCryopreservationForest geneticsGenetic transformationOrganogenesisPlantation forestryRegenerationSomatic embryogenesis

Copyright information

© The Society for In Vitro Biology 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paula M. Pijut
    • 1
  • Keith E. Woeste
    • 1
  • G. Vengadesan
    • 2
  • Charles H. Michler
    • 1
  1. 1.Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC), Northern Research StationUSDA Forest ServiceWest LafayetteUSA
  2. 2.Deparment of Forestry and Natural Resources, HTIRCPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA