Sustainability Science

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 373–383

Whose values count: is a theory of social choice for sustainability science possible?

  • Mark W. Anderson
  • Mario F. Teisl
  • Caroline L. Noblet
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11625-015-0345-1

Cite this article as:
Anderson, M.W., Teisl, M.F. & Noblet, C.L. Sustain Sci (2016) 11: 373. doi:10.1007/s11625-015-0345-1
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Concepts, Methodology, and Knowledge Management for Sustainability Science

Abstract

If sustainability science is to mature as a discipline, it will be important for practitioners to discuss and eventually agree upon the fundamentals of the paradigm on which the new discipline is based. Since sustainability is fundamentally a normative assertion about tradeoffs among values, how society chooses the specifics among these tradeoffs is central to the sustainability problem. Whose values should count in making social decisions and how should the multiplicity of values that exist be known and used in that decision process? Given the vast spatial domains and temporal domains at work in the sustainability problem, we need some means of reconciling the inevitably divergent choices depending on whose values we count, how we know what those values are, and how we count them in making social decisions. We propose an approach to dealing with these questions based on Rawls (A theory of justice. Belknap Press, Cambridge, 1971) and explore the problems inherent in a social choice theory for sustainability science.

Keywords

Social choice Values Philosophy of science Public policy 

Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark W. Anderson
    • 1
  • Mario F. Teisl
    • 1
  • Caroline L. Noblet
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MaineOronoUSA

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