Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 27, Issue 6, pp 730–738

Impact of Comorbidity on Colorectal Cancer Screening Cost-Effectiveness Study in Diabetic Populations

  • Tuan A. Dinh
  • Peter Alperin
  • Louise C. Walter
  • Robert Smith
Reviews

DOI: 10.1007/s11606-011-1972-6

Cite this article as:
Dinh, T.A., Alperin, P., Walter, L.C. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (2012) 27: 730. doi:10.1007/s11606-011-1972-6

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND

Although comorbidity has been shown to affect the benefits and risks of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, it has not been accounted for in prior cost-effectiveness analyses of CRC screening.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the impact of diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, a highly prevalent comorbidity in U.S. adults aged 50 and older, on health and economic outcomes of CRC screening.

DESIGN

Cost-effectiveness analysis using an integrated modeling framework.

DATA SOURCES

Derived from basic and epidemiologic studies, clinical trials, cancer registries, and a colonoscopy database.

TARGET POPULATION

U.S. 50-year-old population.

TIME HORIZON

Lifetime.

PERSPECTIVE

Costs are based on Medicare reimbursement rates.

INTERVENTIONS

Colonoscopy screening at ten-year intervals, beginning at age 50, and discontinued after age 50, 60, 70, 80 or death.

OUTCOME MEASURES

Health outcomes and cost effectiveness.

RESULTS OF BASE-CASE ANALYSIS

Diabetes diagnosis significantly affects cost-effectiveness of CRC screening. For the same CRC screening strategy, a person without diabetes at age 50 gained on average 0.07–0.13 life years more than a person diagnosed with diabetes at age 50 or younger. For a population of 1,000 patients diagnosed with diabetes at baseline, increasing stop age from 70 years to 80 years increased quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained by 0.3, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $206,671/QALY. The corresponding figures for 1,000 patients without diabetes are 2.3 QALYs and $46,957/QALY.

RESULTS OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS

Cost-effectiveness results are sensitive to cost of colonoscopy and adherence to colonoscopy screening.

LIMITATIONS

Results depend on accuracy of model assumptions.

CONCLUSION

Benefits of CRC screening differ substantially for patients with and without diabetes. Screening for CRC in patients diagnosed with diabetes at age 50 or younger is not cost-effective beyond age 70. Screening recommendations should be individualized based on the presence of comorbidities.

KEY WORDS

colorectal cancer screeningcost-effectiveness analysishealth care modelingcomorbidityoptimal screening cessationindividualized guidelines

Supplementary material

11606_2011_1972_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1.3 mb)
(PDF 1.31 MB)

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tuan A. Dinh
    • 1
  • Peter Alperin
    • 1
  • Louise C. Walter
    • 2
  • Robert Smith
    • 3
  1. 1.Archimedes Inc.San FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Division of GeriatricsSan Francisco VA Medical Center and University of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Cancer Control DepartmentAmerican Cancer SocietyAtlantaUSA