Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 115–121

Erectile Dysfunction Drug Receipt, Risky Sexual Behavior and Sexually Transmitted Diseases in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected Men

  • Robert L. Cook
  • Kathleen A. McGinnis
  • Jeffrey H. Samet
  • David A. Fiellin
  • Maria C. Rodriquez-Barradas
  • Kevin L. Kraemer
  • Cynthia L. Gibert
  • R. Scott Braithwaite
  • Joseph L. Goulet
  • Kristin Mattocks
  • Stephen Crystal
  • Adam J. Gordon
  • Krisann K. Oursler
  • Amy C. Justice
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11606-009-1164-9

Cite this article as:
Cook, R.L., McGinnis, K.A., Samet, J.H. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (2010) 25: 115. doi:10.1007/s11606-009-1164-9

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Health care providers may be concerned that prescribing erectile dysfunction drugs (EDD) will contribute to risky sexual behavior.

OBJECTIVES

To identify characteristics of men who received EDD prescriptions, determine whether EDD receipt is associated with risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and determine whether these relationships vary for certain sub-groups.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

PARTICIPANTS

Two thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven sexually-active, HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men recruited from eight Veterans Health Affairs outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from participant surveys, electronic medical records, and administrative pharmacy data.

MEASURES

EDD receipt was defined as two or more prescriptions for an EDD, risky sex as having unprotected sex with a partner of serodiscordant or unknown HIV status, and STDs, according to self-report.

RESULTS

Overall, 28% of men received EDD in the previous year. Eleven percent of men reported unprotected sex with a serodiscordant/unknown partner in the past year (HIV-infected 15%, HIV-uninfected 6%, P < 0.001). Compared to men who did not receive EDD, men who received EDD were equally likely to report risky sexual behavior (11% vs. 10%, p = 0.9) and STDs (7% vs 7%, p = 0.7). In multivariate analyses, EDD receipt was not significantly associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in the entire sample or in subgroups of substance users or men who had sex with men.

CONCLUSION

EDD receipt was common but not associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in this sample of HIV-infected and uninfected men. However, risky sexual behaviors persist in a minority of HIV-infected men, indicating ongoing need for prevention interventions.

KEY WORDS

HIV infectionrisky sexual behaviorSTDsmenphosphodiesterase inhibitors

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Cook
    • 1
  • Kathleen A. McGinnis
    • 2
  • Jeffrey H. Samet
    • 3
  • David A. Fiellin
    • 4
  • Maria C. Rodriquez-Barradas
    • 5
  • Kevin L. Kraemer
    • 6
  • Cynthia L. Gibert
    • 7
  • R. Scott Braithwaite
    • 8
  • Joseph L. Goulet
    • 4
    • 9
  • Kristin Mattocks
    • 9
  • Stephen Crystal
    • 10
  • Adam J. Gordon
    • 2
    • 6
  • Krisann K. Oursler
    • 11
  • Amy C. Justice
    • 4
    • 9
  1. 1.Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and MedicineUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Pittsburgh VA Healthcare SystemPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Boston UniversityBostonUSA
  4. 4.Yale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  5. 5.Michael E Debakey VA Medical Center and Baylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  6. 6.University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  7. 7.Washington DC VAMC and George Washington UniversityWashingtonUSA
  8. 8.New York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  9. 9.VA Connecticut Healthcare SystemWest HavenUSA
  10. 10.Rutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA
  11. 11.Baltimore VA and University of MarylandBaltimoreUSA