Journal of General Internal Medicine

, 24:451

Establishing a General Medical Outpatient Clinic for Cancer Survivors in a Public City Hospital Setting

Authors

    • Queens Cancer CenterQueens Hospital Center
  • David W. Lounsbury
    • Department of Epidemiology and Population HealthAlbert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University
  • Mary S. McCabe
    • Office of SurvivorshipMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • Elisa Weiss
    • Department of Epidemiology and Population HealthAlbert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University
  • Meghan  Newcomer
    • Office of SurvivorshipMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • Deena J. Nelson
    • Queens Cancer CenterQueens Hospital Center
  • Debra Brennessel
    • Department of Medicine, Division of Ambulatory CareQueens Hospital Center
  • Bruce D. Rapkin
    • Department of Epidemiology and Population HealthAlbert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University
  • M. Margaret Kemeny
    • Queens Cancer CenterQueens Hospital Center
Innovations in Clinical Practice

DOI: 10.1007/s11606-009-1027-4

Cite this article as:
Goytia, E.J., Lounsbury, D.W., McCabe, M.S. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (2009) 24: 451. doi:10.1007/s11606-009-1027-4

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION

Many cancer centers and community hospitals are developing novel models of survivorship care. However, few are specifically focused on services for socio-economically disadvantaged cancer survivors.

AIMS

To describe a new model of survivorship care serving culturally diverse, urban adult cancer patients and to present findings from a feasibility evaluation.

SETTING

Adult cancer patients treated at a public city hospital cancer center.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The clinic provides comprehensive medical and psychosocial services for patients within a public hospital cancer center where they receive their oncology care.

PROGRAM EVALUATION

Longitudinal data collected over a 3-year period were used to describe patient demographics, patient needs, and services delivered. Since inception, 410 cancer patients have been served. Demand for services has grown steadily. Hypertension was the most frequent comorbid condition treated. Pain, depression, cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia, and bowel dysfunction were the most common post-treatment problems experienced by the patients. Financial counseling was an important patient resource.

DISCUSSION

This new clinical service has been well-integrated into its public urban hospital setting and constitutes an innovative model of health-care delivery for socio-economically challenged, culturally diverse adult cancer survivors.

KEY WORDS

adult cancer survivorshipprimary careracial and ethnic diversitysocio-economically disadvantaged personslong-term follow-up

Supplementary material

11606_2009_1027_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (77 kb)
ESM 1(PDF 77.2 KB)

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2009