Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 24, Issue 6, pp 716–720

Residents’ Experience of Scholarly Activities is Associated with Higher Satisfaction with Residency Training

  • Osamu Takahashi
  • Sachiko Ohde
  • Joshua L. Jacobs
  • Yasuharu Tokuda
  • Fumio Omata
  • Tsuguya Fukui
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11606-009-0970-4

Cite this article as:
Takahashi, O., Ohde, S., Jacobs, J.L. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (2009) 24: 716. doi:10.1007/s11606-009-0970-4

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND

The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan has been promoting participation in scholarly activities for physicians during residency training. However, there is debate regarding whether this is worthwhile for residents.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate residents’ opinions of engaging in scholarly activities and identify factors associated with overall satisfaction with their training program.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional national survey.

PARTICIPANTS

1,124 second-year residents in teaching hospitals in Japan in 2007

MEASUREMENTS

Collected data included demographics, teaching hospital characteristics and resources, residents’ research experiences, including type of activities, barriers to performing scholarly activities, residents’ opinions of scholarly requirements, and resident satisfaction with their residency program.

RESULTS

1,124 residents/1,500 responded for a response rate of 74.9%. Our data showed that 60.2% of Japanese residents engaged in some type of scholarly activity. Barriers included: “No resident time”; “No mentor;” and “No resident interest.” Sixty-three percent of residents thought that research should be a residency requirement. In multivariate logistic analysis, residents’ overall satisfaction with their residency program was significantly associated with participation in research activity (odds ratio (OR), 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1–2.1); male gender (OR, 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1–2.2); satisfaction with residency compensation (OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.6–5.0), and satisfaction with the residency curriculum (OR, 19.5; 95% CI, 13.7–27.7).

CONCLUSIONS

The majority of residents surveyed thought that research activity was worthwhile. Residents’ participation in research activity was associated with higher levels of satisfaction with residency training. Implementing measures to overcome existing barriers may have educational benefits for residents.

KEY WORDS

residencyclinical researchjob satisfactionmedical educationJapan

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Osamu Takahashi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sachiko Ohde
    • 2
  • Joshua L. Jacobs
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yasuharu Tokuda
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fumio Omata
    • 1
    • 4
  • Tsuguya Fukui
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of MedicineSt. Luke’s International HospitalTokyoJapan
  2. 2.St. Luke’s Life Science InstituteTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Office of Medical EducationUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA
  4. 4.Gastroenterology CenterSt. Luke’s International HospitalTokyoJapan