Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 23, Issue 12, pp 2010–2013

Pneumococcal Vaccination in General Internal Medicine Practice: Current Practice and Future Possibilities

Authors

    • Department of PediatricsUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Preventive Medicine and BiometricsUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Colorado Health Outcomes ProgramUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Children’s Outcomes Research ProgramThe Children’s Hospital
  • Laura Hurley
    • General Internal MedicineUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Division of General Internal MedicineDenver Health
  • Shannon Stokley
    • National Center for Immunization and Respiratory DiseasesCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Matthew F. Daley
    • Department of PediatricsUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Colorado Health Outcomes ProgramUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Children’s Outcomes Research ProgramThe Children’s Hospital
  • Lori A. Crane
    • Preventive Medicine and BiometricsUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Colorado Health Outcomes ProgramUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Children’s Outcomes Research ProgramThe Children’s Hospital
  • Brenda L. Beaty
    • Colorado Health Outcomes ProgramUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Children’s Outcomes Research ProgramThe Children’s Hospital
  • L. Miriam Dickinson
    • Family MedicineUniversity of Colorado Denver
  • Christine Babbel
    • Children’s Outcomes Research ProgramThe Children’s Hospital
  • Jennifer Barrow
    • Children’s Outcomes Research ProgramThe Children’s Hospital
  • John F. Steiner
    • General Internal MedicineUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Preventive Medicine and BiometricsUniversity of Colorado Denver
    • Colorado Health Outcomes ProgramUniversity of Colorado Denver
Brief Report

DOI: 10.1007/s11606-008-0800-0

Cite this article as:
Kempe, A., Hurley, L., Stokley, S. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (2008) 23: 2010. doi:10.1007/s11606-008-0800-0

Abstract

Background

Pneumococcal vaccine (PPV) is recommended for adults ≥65 years and those with chronic illness, but there are potential advantages of universal vaccination of adults age 50–64 years.

Objective

To assess reported (1) recommendations and administration practices of general internists for PPV, (2) barriers to vaccination, and (3) willingness to expand vaccination to all adults ≥50 years.

Methods

National survey of general internists representative of the American College of Physicians.

Results

Response rate was 74% (N = 326). Although 99% reported giving PPV, less than 20% used a computerized database to identify eligible patients by age or diagnoses and only 6% recalled patients. Major barriers included acute problems taking precedence over preventive care (39%), difficulty determining vaccination history (30%), not thinking of it/not a priority (20%), and inadequate reimbursement for vaccine (19%). If ACIP expanded recommendations, 60% would definitely and 37% would probably institute this change.

Conclusions

Most general internists reported giving PPV, but delivery was hindered by competing demands, lack of systems to identify patients needing vaccination, and reimbursement issues. Barriers might be decreased by a policy of universal vaccination of adults ≥50 years, and the majority of physicians reported they would follow such a recommendation if it were made.

KEY WORDS

immunization delivery pneumococcal vaccine pneumococcus pneumonia

Supplementary material

11606_2008_800_MOESM1_ESM.doc (118 kb)
ESM 1 (DOC 118 KB)

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2008