Impact of an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum on Resident Use of Electronic Resources: A Randomized Controlled Study

  • Sarang Kim
  • Laura R. Willett
  • David J. Murphy
  • Kerry O’Rourke
  • Ranita Sharma
  • Judy A. Shea
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11606-008-0766-y

Cite this article as:
Kim, S., Willett, L.R., Murphy, D.J. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (2008) 23: 1804. doi:10.1007/s11606-008-0766-y

Abstract

Background

Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is widely taught in residency, but evidence for effectiveness of EBM teaching on changing residents’ behavior is limited.

Objective

To investigate the impact of an EBM curriculum on residents’ use of evidence-based resources in a simulated clinical experience.

Design/Participants

Fifty medicine residents randomized to an EBM teaching or control group.

Measurements

A validated test of EBM knowledge (Fresno test) was administered before and after intervention. Post intervention, residents twice completed a Web-based, multiple-choice instrument (15 items) comprised of clinical vignettes, first without then with access to electronic resources. Use of electronic resources was tracked using ProxyPlus software. Within group pre–post differences and between group post-test differences were examined.

Results

There was more improvement in EBM knowledge (100-point scale) for the intervention group compared to the control group (mean score increase 22 vs. 12, p = 0.012). In the simulated clinical experience, the most commonly accessed resources were Ovid (71% of residents accessed) and InfoPOEMs (62%) for the EBM group and UptoDate (67%) and MDConsult (58%) for the control group. Residents in the EBM group were more likely to use evidence-based resources than the control group. Performance on clinical vignettes was similar between the groups both at baseline (p = 0.19) and with access to information resources (p = 0.89).

Conclusions

EBM teaching improved EBM knowledge and increased use of evidence-based resources by residents, but did not improve performance on Web-based clinical vignettes. Future studies will need to examine impact of EBM teaching on clinical outcomes.

KEY WORDS

evidence-based medicine (EBM) changing residents’ behavior EBM curriculum 

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarang Kim
    • 1
    • 4
  • Laura R. Willett
    • 1
  • David J. Murphy
    • 2
  • Kerry O’Rourke
    • 1
  • Ranita Sharma
    • 1
  • Judy A. Shea
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolNew BrunswickUSA
  2. 2.Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.University of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.Division of General Internal MedicineUMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolNew BrunswickUSA