Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 22, Issue 5, pp 632–638

Stress from Uncertainty from Graduation to Retirement—A Population-Based Study of Swiss Physicians

Authors

    • Department of Community Medicine, Medical Outpatient ClinicUniversity Hospitals of Geneva
  • Thomas V. Perneger
    • Quality of Care ServiceUniversity Hospitals of Geneva, and Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Geneva
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11606-007-0159-7

Cite this article as:
Bovier, P.A. & Perneger, T.V. J GEN INTERN MED (2007) 22: 632. doi:10.1007/s11606-007-0159-7

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Uncertainty shapes many decisions made by physicians everyday. Uncertainty and physicians’ inability to handle it may result in substandard care and unexplained variations in patterns of care.

OBJECTIVE

To describe socio-demographic and professional characteristics of reactions to uncertainty among physicians from all specialties, including physicians in training.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional postal survey.

PARTICIPANT

All physicians practicing in Geneva, Switzerland (n = 1,994).

MEASUREMENT

Reaction to medical care uncertainty was measured with the Anxiety Due to Uncertainty and Concern About Bad Outcomes scales. The questionnaire also included items about professional characteristics and work-related satisfaction scales.

RESULTS

After the first mailing and two reminders, 1,184 physicians responded to the survey. In univariate analysis, women, junior physicians, surgical specialists, generalist physicians, and physicians with lower workloads had higher scores in both scales. In multivariate models, sex, medical specialty, and workload remained significantly associated with both scales, whereas clinical experience remained associated only with concern about bad outcomes. Higher levels of anxiety due to uncertainty were associated with lower scores of work-related satisfaction, while higher levels of concern about bad outcomes were associated with lower satisfaction scores for patient care, personal rewards, professional relations, and general satisfaction, but not for work-related burden or satisfaction with income-prestige. The negative effect of anxiety due to uncertainty on work-related satisfaction was more important for physicians in training.

CONCLUSION

Physicians’ reactions to uncertainty in medical care were associated with several dimensions of work-related satisfaction. Physicians in training experienced the greatest impact of anxiety due to uncertainty on their work-related satisfaction. Incorporating strategies to deal with uncertainty into residency training may be useful.

KEY WORDS

uncertaintyquality of caremedical trainingwork-related satisfaction

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2007