Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 12, Issue 6, pp 364–371

Tube Feeding Preferences Among Nursing Home Residents

  • Linda A. O'Brien
  • Elisabeth A. Siegert
  • Jeane Ann Grisso
  • Greg Maislin
  • Karin LaPann
  • Lois K. Evans
  • Karol P. Krotki
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11606-006-5085-6

Cite this article as:
O'Brien, L., Siegert, E., Grisso, J. et al. J GEN INTERN MED (1997) 12: 364. doi:10.1007/s11606-006-5085-6

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the preferences of nursing home residents regarding the use of tube feedings and to characterize the clinical, functional, and psychosocial factors that are associated with preferences. DESIGN: In-person survey. SETTING: Forty-nine randomly selected nursing homes. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred seventy-nine randomly selected, decisionally capable, nursing home residents. MAIN RESULTS: Thirty-three percent of participants would prefer tube feedings if no longer able to eat because of permanent brain damage. Factors positively associated with preferences for tube feedings include male gender, African-American race, never having discussed treatment preferences with family members or health care providers, never having signed an advance directive, and believing that tube feeding preferences will be respected by the nursing home staff. Twenty-five percent of the participants changed from preferring tube feedings to not preferring tube feedings on learning that physical restraints are sometimes applied during the tube feeding process. CONCLUSIONS: Demographic and social factors are associated with preferences for tube feedings. The provision of information about the potential use of physical restraint altered a proportion of nursing home residents' treatment preferences.

Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda A. O'Brien
    • 1
  • Elisabeth A. Siegert
    • 3
  • Jeane Ann Grisso
    • 1
  • Greg Maislin
    • 1
  • Karin LaPann
    • 1
  • Lois K. Evans
    • 2
  • Karol P. Krotki
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Division of General Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.School of Nursing, University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at CamdenCamdenUSA
  4. 4.Institute for Survey Research, Temple UniversityPhiladelphia, Pa.USA