Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

, Volume 18, Issue 8, pp 1445–1451

Laparoscopic Spleen-Preserving Distal Pancreatectomy: The Technique Must Suit the Lesion

Authors

  • David J. Worhunsky
    • Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of SurgeryStanford University Medical Center
  • Yulia Zak
    • Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of SurgeryStanford University Medical Center
  • Monica M. Dua
    • Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of SurgeryStanford University Medical Center
  • George A. Poultsides
    • Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of SurgeryStanford University Medical Center
  • Jeffrey A. Norton
    • Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of SurgeryStanford University Medical Center
    • Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of SurgeryStanford University Medical Center
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11605-014-2561-x

Cite this article as:
Worhunsky, D.J., Zak, Y., Dua, M.M. et al. J Gastrointest Surg (2014) 18: 1445. doi:10.1007/s11605-014-2561-x

Abstract

Splenic preservation is currently recommended during minimally invasive surgery for benign tumors of the distal pancreas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients undergoing laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy, with particular attention paid to the technique used for spleen preservation (splenic vessel ligation vs preservation). A review of consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with the intention of splenic preservation was conducted. Patient demographics, operative data, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. Fifty-five consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with the intention of splenic preservation; 5 required splenectomy (9 %). Of the remaining 50 patients, 31 (62 %) had splenic vessel ligation, and 19 (38 %) had vessel preservation. Patient demographics and tumor size were similar. The vessel ligation group had significantly more pancreas removed (95 vs 52 mm, P < 0.001) and longer operative times (256 vs 201 min, P = 0.008). Postoperative outcomes, complication rates, and splenic viability were similar between groups. Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy is a safe operation with a high rate of success (91 %). Vessel ligation was the chosen technical strategy for lesions that required resection of a greater length of pancreas. We found no advantage to either technique with respect to outcomes and splenic preservation. Operative approach should reflect technical considerations including location in the pancreas.

Keywords

Minimally invasive surgeryPancreas surgeryLaparoscopic pancreatectomySpleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy

Copyright information

© The Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract 2014