, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 269-278
Date: 16 Oct 2013

Radiographic Tumor–Vein Interface as a Predictor of Intraoperative, Pathologic, and Oncologic Outcomes in Resectable and Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

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Abstract

Background

Venous resection may be required to achieve complete resection of pancreatic cancers. We assessed the ability of radiographic criteria to predict the need for superior mesenteric–portal vein (SMV-PV) resection and the presence of histologic vein invasion.

Methods

All patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy from 2004 to 2011 at the authors’ institution were identified. Preoperative pancreatic protocol CT images were re-reviewed to characterize the extent of tumor–vein circumferential interface (TVI) as demonstrating no interface, ≤180° of vessel circumference, >180° of vessel circumference, or occlusion. Findings were correlated with the need for venous resection, histologic venous invasion, and survival.

Results

A total of 254 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy and met inclusion criteria; 98 (39.6 %) required SMV-PV resection. In our cohort, 76.4 % of patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The TVI classification system predicted with fair accuracy both the need for SMV-PV resection at the time of surgery and histologic invasion of the vein. In particular, 89.5 % of patients with TVI >180° or occlusion required SMV-PV resection. Of those, 82.4 % had documented histologic SMV-PV invasion. TVI ≤180° was associated with favorable overall survival compared to a greater circumferential interface.

Conclusions

A tomographic classification of the tumor–SMV-PV interface can predict the need for venous resection, pathologic venous involvement, and survival. To assist in treatment planning, a standardized assessment of this anatomic relationship should be routinely performed.

Presented at a plenary session of the 54th Annual Meeting of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract, May 21st, 2013, Orlando, FL, USA.