Potato Research

, Volume 53, Issue 2, pp 83–93

Foliar Symptoms Caused by Potato mop-top virus on Potato Plants During Vegetative Propagation in Scotland and Their Association With Tuber Yield, Spraing and Tuber Infection

Authors

    • SASA (Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture)
  • A. M. Cameron
    • SASA (Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture)
  • M. McCreath
    • SASA (Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture)
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11540-010-9153-2

Cite this article as:
Carnegie, S.F., Cameron, A.M. & McCreath, M. Potato Res. (2010) 53: 83. doi:10.1007/s11540-010-9153-2

Abstract

The effect of foliar symptomatic infection by Potato mop-top virus (PMTV) on yield of tubers, spraing and infection in daughter tubers, and foliar symptom development and tuber infection in the following generations of propagation was investigated in commercial seed potato crops in Scotland. Six crops covering cvs Atlantic, Hermes, Nicola and Cara were studied between 2000 and 2006 by labelling paired replicates of plants with foliar symptoms and plants with no symptoms. Tubers from plants with no symptoms rarely produced plants with foliar symptoms in the following generation. Plants with no symptoms produced more infected tubers if they had been derived from plants with foliar symptoms the previous year than from plants with no symptoms. The proportion of daughter plants with foliar symptoms produced by tubers from plants with foliar symptoms in year 1 ranged from 19–41% and seemed to be associated with the severity of foliar symptoms. The detection of PMTV by ELISA in samples of leaves from plants with foliar symptoms ranged from 13% for cv. Cara to 59% for a crop of cv. Atlantic in 2004. The amounts of spraing were generally low but tended to be greater for tubers from plants with foliar symptoms than those from plants with no symptoms. These results indicate that roguing plants with foliar symptoms in seed potato crops could achieve an improvement in crop health but might be impractical when diseased plants are too prevalent.

Keywords

Cultivar ELISA Roguing Seed potato certification Virus transmission

Abbreviations

DAS-ELISA

Double antibody sandwich-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

Copyright information

© EAPR 2010