Journal of Urban Health

, Volume 90, Issue 6, pp 1181–1193

Differences in Substance Use, Psychosocial Characteristics and HIV-Related Sexual Risk Behavior Between Black Men Who Have Sex with Men Only (BMSMO) and Black Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women (BMSMW) in Six US Cities

Authors

    • Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsThe University of Maryland
  • Rotrease Regan
    • Department of Family MedicineThe University of California Los Angeles
  • Leo Wilton
    • Department of Human DevelopmentBinghamton University, College of Community and Public Affairs
  • Nina T. Harawa
    • Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science
  • San San Ou
    • Vaccine and Infectious Disease DivisionFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Lei Wang
    • Vaccine and Infectious Disease DivisionFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Steve Shoptaw
    • Department of Family MedicineThe University of California Los Angeles
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11524-013-9811-1

Cite this article as:
Dyer, T.P., Regan, R., Wilton, L. et al. J Urban Health (2013) 90: 1181. doi:10.1007/s11524-013-9811-1

Abstract

We assessed associations in substance use, psychosocial characteristics, and HIV-related sexual risk behaviors, comparing characteristics of Black men who only have sex with other men only (BMSMO; n = 839) to Black men who have sex with men and women (BMSMW; n = 590). The study analyzed baseline data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network Brothers Study (HPTN 061), a feasibility study of a multi-component intervention for Black MSM in six US cities. Bivariate analyses compared BMSMO to BMSMW along demographics, substance use, psychosocial characteristics, and HIV-related sexual risk behaviors. Logistic regression models then assessed multivariable associations between being BMSMW and the odds of engaging in HIV-related sexual risk behaviors. Adjusted analyses revealed that BMSMW remained more likely to have unprotected anal intercourse while under the influence of alcohol (AOR: 1.45; 95 % CI:1.11–1.90) and were more likely to receive money/drugs for sex (AOR: 2.11; 95 % CI:1.48–3.03), compared to BMSMO. Substance use is an important factor to be considered when developing risk-reduction interventions for BMSMW. Structural interventions that address factors that may contribute to exchange sex among these men are also warranted.

Keywords

HIVBlack MSMSubstance useMental healthHomophobiaSexual riskSexual minorities

Copyright information

© The New York Academy of Medicine 2013