Journal of Urban Health

, Volume 90, Issue 6, pp 1181–1193

Differences in Substance Use, Psychosocial Characteristics and HIV-Related Sexual Risk Behavior Between Black Men Who Have Sex with Men Only (BMSMO) and Black Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women (BMSMW) in Six US Cities

Authors

    • Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsThe University of Maryland
  • Rotrease Regan
    • Department of Family MedicineThe University of California Los Angeles
  • Leo Wilton
    • Department of Human DevelopmentBinghamton University, College of Community and Public Affairs
  • Nina T. Harawa
    • Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science
  • San San Ou
    • Vaccine and Infectious Disease DivisionFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Lei Wang
    • Vaccine and Infectious Disease DivisionFred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  • Steve Shoptaw
    • Department of Family MedicineThe University of California Los Angeles
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11524-013-9811-1

Cite this article as:
Dyer, T.P., Regan, R., Wilton, L. et al. J Urban Health (2013) 90: 1181. doi:10.1007/s11524-013-9811-1

Abstract

We assessed associations in substance use, psychosocial characteristics, and HIV-related sexual risk behaviors, comparing characteristics of Black men who only have sex with other men only (BMSMO; n = 839) to Black men who have sex with men and women (BMSMW; n = 590). The study analyzed baseline data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network Brothers Study (HPTN 061), a feasibility study of a multi-component intervention for Black MSM in six US cities. Bivariate analyses compared BMSMO to BMSMW along demographics, substance use, psychosocial characteristics, and HIV-related sexual risk behaviors. Logistic regression models then assessed multivariable associations between being BMSMW and the odds of engaging in HIV-related sexual risk behaviors. Adjusted analyses revealed that BMSMW remained more likely to have unprotected anal intercourse while under the influence of alcohol (AOR: 1.45; 95 % CI:1.11–1.90) and were more likely to receive money/drugs for sex (AOR: 2.11; 95 % CI:1.48–3.03), compared to BMSMO. Substance use is an important factor to be considered when developing risk-reduction interventions for BMSMW. Structural interventions that address factors that may contribute to exchange sex among these men are also warranted.

Keywords

HIV Black MSM Substance use Mental health Homophobia Sexual risk Sexual minorities

Copyright information

© The New York Academy of Medicine 2013