Journal of Urban Health

, Volume 90, Issue 5, pp 810–831

Promoting Health and Advancing Development through Improved Housing in Low-Income Settings

Authors

    • Faculty of Epidemiology and Population HealthLondon School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
    • Faculty of Public Health and PolicyLondon School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
  • Nigel Bruce
    • Department of Public Health and Policy, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, Whelan Building, QuadrangleThe University of Liverpool
  • Sandy Cairncross
    • Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
  • Michael Davies
    • UCL Bartlett School of Graduate Studies
  • Katie Greenland
    • Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
  • Alexandra Hiscox
    • Institut Pasteur du Laos
    • Laboratory of EntomologyWageningen University and Research Centre
  • Steve Lindsay
    • School of Biological and Biomedical SciencesDurham University
  • Tom Lindsay
    • Environmental Design, Robinson CollegeUniversity of Cambridge
  • David Satterthwaite
    • International Institute for Environment and Development
  • Paul Wilkinson
    • Faculty of Public Health and PolicyLondon School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11524-012-9773-8

Cite this article as:
Haines, A., Bruce, N., Cairncross, S. et al. J Urban Health (2013) 90: 810. doi:10.1007/s11524-012-9773-8

Abstract

There is major untapped potential to improve health in low-income communities through improved housing design, fittings, materials and construction. Adverse effects on health from inadequate housing can occur through a range of mechanisms, both direct and indirect, including as a result of extreme weather, household air pollution, injuries or burns, the ingress of disease vectors and lack of clean water and sanitation. Collaborative action between public health professionals and those involved in developing formal and informal housing could advance both health and development by addressing risk factors for a range of adverse health outcomes. Potential trade-offs between design features which may reduce the risk of some adverse outcomes whilst increasing the risk of others must be explicitly considered.

Keywords

Housing Household energy Sanitation Development Health

Copyright information

© The New York Academy of Medicine 2012