, Volume 87, Issue 5, pp 813-826
Date: 13 Jul 2010

Comparing Selected Measures of Health Outcomes and Health-Seeking Behaviors in Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese Communities of Chicago: Results from Local Health Surveys

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Abstract

We describe how local community organizations partnered to conduct a survey in the Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese populations of Chicago to compare health outcomes and assess progress toward Healthy People 2010 goals. Interviews were conducted with 380 randomly selected Chinese adults through door-to-door sampling, and with 250 Cambodian adults and 150 Vietnamese adults through respondent-driven sampling. Data on 14 key health outcomes are described for this analysis. The three surveyed communities were generally poorer, less educated, more often foreign-born, and had less English proficiency than Asians nationally. There were few significant variations among the three populations, but there were notable differences in the burden of tuberculosis, obesity, diabetes, and arthritis. Insurance coverage and cancer-screening utilization were also significantly lower than for US Asians. Health information about Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese populations in Chicago are available for the first time and serve as baseline data for community interventions. Findings highlight important health concerns for these populations and have implications for funders and policy makers in allocating resources, setting health priorities, and addressing health disparities.

This paper is based on the results of the survey project conducted by the Asian Health Coalition of Illinois (AHCI) in 2006–2008 in partnership with the Sinai Urban Health Institute (SUHI), the Chinese American Service league (CASL), the Chinese Mutual Aid Association (CMAA), and the Cambodian Association of Illinois (CAI). At the time the project was performed, L. Guo, M. Magee, W. Cheung, and H. Liu were all affiliated with AHCI. Authors especially acknowledge all staff and leadership of the community partners, most notably Esther Wong, Steve Brunton, Kompha Seth, Amy Hoskins, and Benjamin Rucker, without whom this study could not have been possible.
Hong Liu is with the Formerly Asian Health Coalition of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA.