Plasmonics

, Volume 2, Issue 2, pp 55–64

Application of Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Detection of Beta Amyloid Using Nanoshells

Authors

    • Department of Biomedical EngineeringTexas A&M University
  • Christopher B. Cowan
    • Department of Chemical & Biochemical EngineeringUniversity of Maryland Baltimore County
  • I-Hsien Chou
    • Department of Biomedical EngineeringTexas A&M University
  • James Pallikal
    • Department of Chemical & Biochemical EngineeringUniversity of Maryland Baltimore County
  • James E. Henry
    • Department of Chemical & Biochemical EngineeringUniversity of Maryland Baltimore County
    • Department of Chemical EngineeringLouisiana State University
  • Melodie E. Benford
    • Department of Biomedical EngineeringTexas A&M University
  • Joseph B. Jackson
    • Nanospectra Biosciences, Inc.
  • Theresa A. Good
    • Department of Chemical & Biochemical EngineeringUniversity of Maryland Baltimore County
  • Gerard L. Coté
    • Department of Biomedical EngineeringTexas A&M University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11468-007-9027-x

Cite this article as:
Beier, H.T., Cowan, C.B., Chou, I. et al. Plasmonics (2007) 2: 55. doi:10.1007/s11468-007-9027-x

Abstract

Currently, no methods exist for the definitive diagnosis of AD premortem. β-amyloid, the primary component of the senile plaques found in patients with this disease, is believed to play a role in its neurotoxicity. We are developing a nanoshell substrate, functionalized with sialic acid residues to mimic neuron cell surfaces, for the surface-enhanced Raman detection of β-amyloid. It is our hope that this sensing mechanism will be able to detect the toxic form of β-amyloid, with structural and concentration information, to aid in the diagnosis of AD and provide insight into the relationship between β-amyloid and disease progression. We have been successfully able to functionalize the nanoshells with the sialic acid residues to allow for the specific binding of β-amyloid to the substrate. We have also shown that a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy response using nanoshells is stable and concentration-dependent with detection into the picomolar range.

Keywords

Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopySERSRaman spectroscopyNanoshellsβ-amyloidAlzheimer’s diseaseCongo redSelf-assembled monolayer

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007