Science in China Series C: Life Sciences

, 50:265

Conservation needs of amphibians in China: A review

Authors

    • Chengdu Institute of BiologyChinese Academy of Sciences
  • Michael Wai Neng Lau
    • Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden
  • Simon N. Stuart
    • IUCN-SSC/CI-CABS Biodiversity Assessment Unit, Center for Applied Biodiversity ScienceConservation International
  • Janice S. Chanson
    • IUCN-SSC/CI-CABS Biodiversity Assessment Unit, Center for Applied Biodiversity ScienceConservation International
  • Neil A. Cox
    • IUCN-SSC/CI-CABS Biodiversity Assessment Unit, Center for Applied Biodiversity ScienceConservation International
  • Debra L. Fischman
    • GIS Laboratory, Center for Applied Biodiversity ScienceConservation International
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11427-007-0021-5

Cite this article as:
Xie, F., Lau, M.W.N., Stuart, S.N. et al. SCI CHINA SER C (2007) 50: 265. doi:10.1007/s11427-007-0021-5

Abstract

The conservation status of all the amphibians in China is analyzed, and the country is shown to be a global priority for conservation in comparison to many other countries of the world. Three Chinese regions are particularly rich in amphibian diversity: Hengduan, Nanling, and Wuyi mountains. Salamanders are more threatened than frogs and toads. Several smaller families show a high propensity to become seriously threatened: Bombinatoridae, Cryptobranchidae, Hynobiidae and Salamandridae. Like other parts of the world, stream-breeding, high-elevation forest amphibians have a much higher likelihood of being seriously threatened. Habitat loss, pollution, and over-harvesting are the most serious threats to Chinese amphibians. Over-harvesting is a less pervasive threat than habitat loss, but it is more likely to drive a species into rapid decline. Five conservation challenges are mentioned with recommendations for the highest priority research and conservation actions.

Keywords

amphibiansconservation statuspriority of the regions and animal grouphabitat preferencesconservation challengeconservation recommendation

Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2007