, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp 147-154
Date: 19 Jun 2007

The Coronal Plane High Tibial Osteotomy. Part 1: A Clinical and Radiographic Analysis of Intermediate Term Outcomes

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Abstract

The coronal plane high tibial osteotomy is a novel technique that is used to treat tibiofemoral malalignment. The authors hypothesize that the coronal plane high tibial osteotomy is (1) efficacious in treating both varus and valgus tibiofemoral malalignment; (2) does not alter the slope of the proximal tibia; and (3) does not alter the relationship between the patella and tibial tubercle. A retrospective review of 25 patients with tibiofemoral malalignment (19 varus/6 valgus) treated with a coronal plane osteotomy with a minimum of 2-year follow-up was performed. A Kaplan–Meyer survival curve was performed using knee arthroplasty and a Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee score <70 as failure criteria. The Insall–Salvati ratio and the proximal tibial slope were measured. A p value of 0.05 was considered significant. At 60-month follow-up, knees with initial varus malalignment had an 84% survival rate using both knee arthroplasty and the HSS score as endpoints. Knees with initial valgus malalignment had an 84 and 60% survival rate using knee arthroplasty and the HSS score as endpoints, respectively. There was no statistically significant change in the Insall–Salvati ratio and proximal tibial slope after coronal plane osteotomy. The coronal plane osteotomy is efficacious in treating varus and valgus tibiofemoral malalignment and does not alter the patellar–tibial tubercle relationship or the posterior tibial slope [case series (level of evidence: IV)].