Journal of Natural Medicines

, Volume 67, Issue 3, pp 554–561

Comparative study of three Plumbago L. species (Plumbaginaceae) by microscopy, UPLC-UV and HPTLC

Authors

  • Ahmed M. Galal
    • National Center for Natural Products Research, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of PharmacyUniversity of Mississippi
  • Vijayasankar Raman
    • National Center for Natural Products Research, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of PharmacyUniversity of Mississippi
  • Bharathi Avula
    • National Center for Natural Products Research, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of PharmacyUniversity of Mississippi
  • Yan-Hong Wang
    • National Center for Natural Products Research, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of PharmacyUniversity of Mississippi
  • Chidananda Swamy Rumalla
    • National Center for Natural Products Research, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of PharmacyUniversity of Mississippi
  • Aruna Dharmapriya Weerasooriya
    • National Center for Natural Products Research, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of PharmacyUniversity of Mississippi
    • National Center for Natural Products Research, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of PharmacyUniversity of Mississippi
    • Department of Pharmacognosy, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of PharmacyUniversity of Mississippi
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11418-012-0717-0

Cite this article as:
Galal, A.M., Raman, V., Avula, B. et al. J Nat Med (2013) 67: 554. doi:10.1007/s11418-012-0717-0

Abstract

This paper presents a comparative study of anatomy of leaves, stems and roots of three species of Plumbago, namely P. auriculata Lam., P. indica L. and P. zeylanica L. by light microscopy. The paper also provides qualitative and quantitative analysis of the naphthoquinone, plumbagin—a major constituent present in these species—using UPLC-UV. Microscopic examinations revealed the presence of distinctive differences in the anatomical features of the leaf, stem and root of the three species, and these can thus be used for identification and authentication of these species. UPLC-UV analysis showed the highest concentration of plumbagin in the roots of P. zeylanica (1.62 % w/w) followed by the roots of P. indica (0.97 % w/w) and then P. auriculata (0.33–0.53 % w/w). In contrast, plumbagin was not detected in the stems and leaves of P. indica and in the leaves of P. auriculata, whereas very low concentrations (<0.02 % w/w) of plumbagin were detected in the stems and leaves of P. zeylanica and in the stems of P. auriculata. HPTLC fingerprints of the leaf and root of the three species exhibited distinguishable profiles, while those of the stems were undifferentiated.

Keywords

PlumbagoPlumbaginaceaeAnatomyMicroscopyPlumbaginUPLC-UVHPTLC

Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Pharmacognosy and Springer Japan 2012