Date: 30 Dec 2010

The Incremental Value of Self-Reported Mental Health Measures in Predicting Functional Outcomes of Veterans

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

Research on patient-centered care supports use of patient/consumer self-report measures in monitoring health outcomes. This study examined the incremental value of self-report mental health measures relative to a clinician-rated measure in predicting functional outcomes among mental health service recipients. Participants (n = 446) completed the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale, the Brief Symptom Inventory, and the Veterans/Rand Short Form-36 at enrollment in the study (T1) and 3 months later (T2). Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) ratings, mental health service utilization, and psychiatric diagnoses were obtained from administrative data files. Controlling for demographic and clinical variables, results indicated that improvement based on the self-report measures significantly predicted one or more functional outcomes (i.e., decreased likelihood of post-enrollment psychiatric hospitalization and increased likelihood of paid employment), above and beyond the predictive value of the GAF. Inclusion of self-report measures may be a useful addition to performance measurement efforts.