The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research

, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 191–204

Access to Adequate Outpatient Depression Care for Mothers in the USA: A Nationally Representative Population-Based Study

Authors

    • Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Public HealthUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Abiola Keller
    • Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Public HealthUniversity of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Carissa Gottlieb
    • Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Public HealthUniversity of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Kristin Litzelman
    • Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Public HealthUniversity of Wisconsin—Madison
  • John Hampton
    • University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Jonathan Maguire
  • Erika W. Hagen
    • Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Public HealthUniversity of Wisconsin—Madison
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11414-009-9194-y

Cite this article as:
Witt, W.P., Keller, A., Gottlieb, C. et al. J Behav Health Serv Res (2011) 38: 191. doi:10.1007/s11414-009-9194-y

Abstract

Maternal depression is often untreated, resulting in serious consequences for mothers and their children. Factors associated with receipt of adequate treatment for depression were examined in a population-based sample of 2,130 mothers in the USA with depression using data from the 1996–2005 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Chi-squared analyses were used to evaluate differences in sociodemographic and health characteristics by maternal depression treatment status (none, some, and adequate). Multivariate regression was used to model the odds of receiving some or adequate treatment, compared to none. Results indicated that only 34.8% of mothers in the USA with depression received adequate treatment. Mothers not in the paid workforce and those with health insurance were more likely to receive treatment, while minority mothers and those with less education were less likely to receive treatment. Understanding disparities in receipt of adequate treatment is critical to designing effective interventions, reducing treatment inequities, and ultimately improving the mental health and health of mothers and their families.

Keywords

maternal depressionaccess to treatment for depressionadequacy of treatment for depressiondisparities in treatment for depressionpopulation-based studyMedical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS)

Copyright information

© National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare 2009