The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research

, 35:290

Expenditures in Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders among Veteran Clinic Users with Diabetes

  • Ranjana Banerjea
  • Usha Sambamoorthi
  • David Smelson
  • Leonard M. Pogach
Regular Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11414-008-9120-8

Cite this article as:
Banerjea, R., Sambamoorthi, U., Smelson, D. et al. J Behav Health Serv Res (2008) 35: 290. doi:10.1007/s11414-008-9120-8

Abstract

Few studies have looked at the health-care expenditures of diabetes patients based on the type of co-occurring conditions of mental illness (MI) or substance use disorders (SUD). Our study analyzes the health-care expenditures associated with various diagnostic clusters of co-occurring drug, alcohol, tobacco use, and mental illness in veterans with diabetes. We merged Veteran Health Administration and Medicare fee-for-service claims database (fiscal years 1999 and 2000) for analysis (N = 390,253) using generalized linear models; SUD/MI were identified using International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition codes. The total average expenditures (fiscal year 2000) were lowest ($6,185) in the “No MI and No SUD” and highest ($19,801) for individuals with schizophrenia/other psychoses and alcohol/drug use. High expenditures were associated with both SUD and MI conditions in diabetes patients, and veterans with alcohol/drug use had the highest expenditures across all groups of MI. These findings reinforce the need to target groups with multiple comorbidities specifically those with serious mental illnesses and alcohol/drug use for interventions to reduce health-care expenditures.

Keywords

diabeteschronic illness with complexityexpendituressubstance usemental illness

Copyright information

© National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ranjana Banerjea
    • 1
  • Usha Sambamoorthi
    • 2
    • 4
    • 6
  • David Smelson
    • 5
  • Leonard M. Pogach
    • 3
    • 7
  1. 1.Center for Healthcare Knowledge Management, VA New Jersey Healthcare SystemEast OrangeUSA
  2. 2.Center for Healthcare Knowledge Management, VA New Jersey Healthcare SystemEast OrangeUSA
  3. 3.Center for Healthcare Knowledge Management, VA New Jersey Healthcare SystemEast OrangeUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Massachussetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  6. 6.Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging ResearchRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA
  7. 7.University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical SchoolNewarkUSA