Influence of Perceived Coercion and Motivation on Treatment Completion and Re-Arrest among Substance-Abusing Offenders

  • Michael Prendergast
  • Lisa Greenwell
  • David Farabee
  • Yih-Ing Hser
Regular Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11414-008-9117-3

Cite this article as:
Prendergast, M., Greenwell, L., Farabee, D. et al. J Behav Health Serv Res (2009) 36: 159. doi:10.1007/s11414-008-9117-3

Abstract

The effects of perceived coercion and motivation on treatment completion and subsequent re-arrest were examined in a sample of substance-abusing offenders assessed for California’s Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act (SACPA) program. Perceived coercion was measured with the McArthur Perceived Coercion Scale; motivation was measured with the subscales of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). At treatment entry, clients were more likely to believe that they had exercised their choice in entering treatment than that they had been coerced into treatment. SACPA clients scored relatively low on Recognition and Ambivalence regarding their drug use but relatively high on Taking Steps to address their drug problem. Correlations between perceived coercion and motivation measures at treatment entry indicated that these are separate constructs. In logistic regression models, the Recognition subscale of the SOCRATES significantly predicted “any re-arrest,” and Ambivalence and Taking Steps predicted “any drug arrest.”

Keywords

perceived coercionmotivationsubstance abuse treatmenttreatment for offenders

Copyright information

© National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Prendergast
    • 1
  • Lisa Greenwell
    • 1
  • David Farabee
    • 1
  • Yih-Ing Hser
    • 1
  1. 1.Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human BehaviorDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLALos AngelesUSA