The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 272–289

Measuring Clinically Meaningful Change Following Mental Health Treatment

  • Susan V. Eisen
  • Gayatri Ranganathan
  • Pradipta Seal
  • Avron SpiroIII
Regular Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11414-007-9066-2

Cite this article as:
Eisen, S.V., Ranganathan, G., Seal, P. et al. J Behav Health Serv Res (2007) 34: 272. doi:10.1007/s11414-007-9066-2

Abstract

Assessment of clinically meaningful change is useful for treatment planning, monitoring progress, and evaluating treatment response. Outcome studies often assess statistically significant change, which may not be clinically meaningful. Study objectives are to: (1) evaluate responsiveness of the BASIS-24© using three methods for determining clinically meaningful change: reliable change index (RCI), effect size (ES), and standard error of measurement (SEM); and (2) determine which method provides an estimate of clinically meaningful change most concordant with other change measures. BASIS-24© assessments were obtained at two time points for 1,397 inpatients and 850 outpatients. The proportion showing clinically meaningful change using each method was compared to the proportion showing change in global mental health, retrospectively reported change, and clinician-assessed change. BASIS-24© demonstrated responsiveness at both aggregate and individual levels. Regarding clinically meaningful improvement and decline, SEM was most concordant with all three outcome measures; regarding no change, RCI was most concordant with all three measures.

Keywords

clinically meaningful changeoutcome assessment

Copyright information

© National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan V. Eisen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gayatri Ranganathan
    • 3
  • Pradipta Seal
    • 1
  • Avron SpiroIII
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Center for Health Quality, Outcomes and Economic Research (CHQOER)Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans HospitalBedfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of Health Policy and ManagementBoston University School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  3. 3.MetaWorks Inc.MedfordUSA
  4. 4.Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC)VA Boston Healthcare SystemBostonUSA
  5. 5.Department of EpidemiologyBoston University School of Public HealthBostonUSA