AGE

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 665–676

Exercise-training-induced changes in metabolic capacity with age: the role of central cardiovascular plasticity

  • Eivind Wang
  • Morten Svendsen Næss
  • Jan Hoff
  • Tobias Lie Albert
  • Quan Pham
  • Russell S. Richardson
  • Jan Helgerud
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11357-013-9596-x

Cite this article as:
Wang, E., Næss, M.S., Hoff, J. et al. AGE (2014) 36: 665. doi:10.1007/s11357-013-9596-x

Abstract

Although aging is typically associated with a decline in maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), young and old subjects, of similar initial muscle metabolic capacity, increased quadriceps VO2max equally when this small muscle mass was trained in isolation. As it is unclear if this preserved exercise-induced plasticity with age is still evident with centrally challenging whole body exercise, we assessed maximal exercise responses in 13 young (24 ± 2 years) and 13 old (60 ± 3 years) males, matched for cycling VO2max (3.82 ± 0.66 and 3.69 ± 0.30 L min−1, respectively), both before and after 8 weeks of high aerobic intensity cycle exercise training. As a consequence of the training both young and old significantly improved VO2max (13 ± 6 vs. 6 ± 7 %) and maximal power output (20 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 %, respectively) from baseline, however, the young exhibited a significantly larger increase than the old. Similarly, independently assessed maximal cardiac output (Qmax) tended to increase more in the young (16 ± 14 %) than in the old (11 ± 12 %), with no change in a-vO2 difference in either group. Further examination of the components of Qmax provided additional evidence of reduced exercise-induced plasticity in both maximal heart rate (young −3 %, old 0 %) and stroke volume (young 19 ± 15, old 11 ± 11 %) in the old. In combination, these findings imply that limited central cardiovascular plasticity may be responsible, at least in part, for the attenuated response to whole body exercise training with increasing age.

Keywords

AgingCardiac outputStroke volumeMaximal oxygen consumptionArterio-venous oxygen difference

Copyright information

© American Aging Association 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eivind Wang
    • 1
  • Morten Svendsen Næss
    • 1
  • Jan Hoff
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tobias Lie Albert
    • 1
  • Quan Pham
    • 1
  • Russell S. Richardson
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
  • Jan Helgerud
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of MedicineThe Norwegian University of Science and TechnologyTrondheimNorway
  2. 2.Department of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationSt.Olavs University HospitalTrondheimNorway
  3. 3.Hokksund Medical Rehabilitation CentreHokksundNorway
  4. 4.Department of Sports and Outdoor Life StudiesTelemark University CollegeNorway
  5. 5.Department of Medicine, Division of GeriatricsUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  6. 6.Department of Exercise and Sport ScienceUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  7. 7.Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical CenterVAMCSalt Lake CityUSA