AGE

, Volume 35, Issue 5, pp 1961–1973

Role of epigenetics in human aging and longevity: genome-wide DNA methylation profile in centenarians and centenarians’ offspring

  • Davide Gentilini
  • Daniela Mari
  • Davide Castaldi
  • Daniel Remondini
  • Giulia Ogliari
  • Rita Ostan
  • Laura Bucci
  • Silvia M. Sirchia
  • Silvia Tabano
  • Francesco Cavagnini
  • Daniela Monti
  • Claudio Franceschi
  • Anna Maria Di Blasio
  • Giovanni Vitale
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11357-012-9463-1

Cite this article as:
Gentilini, D., Mari, D., Castaldi, D. et al. AGE (2013) 35: 1961. doi:10.1007/s11357-012-9463-1

Abstract

The role of epigenetics in the modulation of longevity has not been studied in humans. To this aim, (1) we evaluated the DNA methylation from peripheral leukocytes of 21 female centenarians, their 21 female offspring, 21 offspring of both non-long-lived parents, and 21 young women through ELISA assay, pyrosequencing analysis of Alu sequences, and quantification of methylation in CpG repeats outside CpG islands; (2) we compared the DNA methylation profiles of these populations through Infinium array for genome-wide CpG methylation analysis. We observed an age-related decrease in global DNA methylation and a delay of this process in centenarians’ offspring. Interestingly, literature data suggest a link between the loss of DNA methylation observed during aging and the development of age-associated diseases. Genome-wide methylation analysis evidenced DNA methylation profiles specific for aging and longevity: (1) aging-associated DNA hypermethylation occurs predominantly in genes involved in the development of anatomical structures, organs, and multicellular organisms and in the regulation of transcription; (2) genes involved in nucleotide biosynthesis, metabolism, and control of signal transmission are differently methylated between centenarians’ offspring and offspring of both non-long-lived parents, hypothesizing a role for these genes in human longevity. Our results suggest that a better preservation of DNA methylation status, a slower cell growing/metabolism, and a better control in signal transmission through epigenetic mechanisms may be involved in the process of human longevity. These data fit well with the observations related to the beneficial effects of mild hypothyroidism and insulin-like growth factor I system impairment on the modulation of human lifespan.

Keywords

EpigeneticsLongevityCentenariansCentenarians’ offspringDNA methylationAging

Supplementary material

11357_2012_9463_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (37.7 mb)
ESM 1(PDF 37.6 MB)

Copyright information

© American Aging Association 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Davide Gentilini
    • 1
  • Daniela Mari
    • 2
    • 3
  • Davide Castaldi
    • 1
    • 4
  • Daniel Remondini
    • 5
  • Giulia Ogliari
    • 3
  • Rita Ostan
    • 6
    • 7
  • Laura Bucci
    • 6
    • 7
  • Silvia M. Sirchia
    • 8
  • Silvia Tabano
    • 8
  • Francesco Cavagnini
    • 1
  • Daniela Monti
    • 9
  • Claudio Franceschi
    • 6
    • 7
  • Anna Maria Di Blasio
    • 1
  • Giovanni Vitale
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Centro di Ricerche e Tecnologie BiomedicheIstituto Auxologico Italiano IRCCSMilanItaly
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Sciences and Community HealthUniversity of MilanMilanItaly
  3. 3.Geriatric UnitIRCCS Ca’ Granda Foundation Maggiore Policlinico HospitalMilanItaly
  4. 4.Dipartimento di Informatica, Sistemistica e ComunicazioneUniversita’ degli Studi di Milano-BicoccaMilanItaly
  5. 5.Physics DepartmentBologna UniversityBolognaItaly
  6. 6.Department of Experimental PathologyUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly
  7. 7.CIG-Interdepartmental Center “L. Galvani”University of BolognaBolognaItaly
  8. 8.Medical Genetics Unit, Dipartimento di Medicina, Chirurgia e OdontoiatriaUniversità degli Studi di MilanoMilanItaly
  9. 9.Department of Experimental Pathology and OncologyUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly