Journal of the American Aging Association

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 219–225

Growth hormone and aging

  • Andrzej Bartke
  • Holly Brown-Borg
  • Beth Kinney
  • Julie Mattison
  • Chris Wright
  • Steven Hauck
  • Karen Coschigano
  • John Kopchick
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11357-000-0021-x

Cite this article as:
Bartke, A., Brown-Borg, H., Kinney, B. et al. AGE (2000) 23: 219. doi:10.1007/s11357-000-0021-x

Abstract

The potential usefulness of growth hormone (GH) as an anti-aging therapy is of considerable current interest. Secretion of GH normally declines during aging and administration of GH can reverse age-related changes in body composition. However, mutant dwarf mice with congenital GH deficiency and GH resistant GH-R-KO mice live much longer than their normal siblings, while a pathological elevation of GH levels reduces life expectancy in both mice and men. We propose that the actions of GH on growth, development, and adult body size may serve as important determinants of aging and life span, while the age-related decline in GH levels contributes to some of the symptoms of aging.

Copyright information

© American Aging Association, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrzej Bartke
    • 1
  • Holly Brown-Borg
    • 2
  • Beth Kinney
    • 1
  • Julie Mattison
    • 1
    • 3
  • Chris Wright
    • 1
  • Steven Hauck
    • 1
  • Karen Coschigano
    • 4
  • John Kopchick
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologySouthern Illinois University, School of MedicineCarbondale
  2. 2.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of North Dakota, School of Medicine, Edwin James Research CenterGrand Forks
  3. 3.Molecular Physiology and Genetics SectionNational Institutes of Health, National Institute on AgingBethesda
  4. 4.Edison Biotechnology InstituteOhio UniversityAthens
  5. 5.Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Osteopathic MedicineOhio UniversityAthens

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