Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 18, Issue 7, pp 1202–1212

Temporal variations of atmospheric aerosol in four European urban areas

  • Maria Lianou
  • Marie-Cecile Chalbot
  • Ilias G. Kavouras
  • Anastasia Kotronarou
  • Anna Karakatsani
  • Antonis Analytis
  • Klea Katsouyanni
  • Arto Puustinen
  • Kaarle Hameri
  • Marko Vallius
  • Juha Pekkanen
  • Claire Meddings
  • Roy M. Harrison
  • Jon G. Ayres
  • Harry ten Brick
  • Gerard Kos
  • Kees Meliefste
  • Jeroen de Hartog
  • Gerard Hoek
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11356-011-0471-y

Cite this article as:
Lianou, M., Chalbot, M., Kavouras, I.G. et al. Environ Sci Pollut Res (2011) 18: 1202. doi:10.1007/s11356-011-0471-y
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Abstract

Purpose

The concentrations of PM10 mass, PM2.5 mass and particle number were continuously measured for 18 months in urban background locations across Europe to determine the spatial and temporal variability of particulate matter.

Methods

Daily PM10 and PM2.5 samples were continuously collected from October 2002 to April 2004 in background areas in Helsinki, Athens, Amsterdam and Birmingham. Particle mass was determined using analytical microbalances with precision of 1 μg. Pre- and post-reflectance measurements were taken using smoke-stain reflectometers. One-minute measurements of particle number were obtained using condensation particle counters.

Results

The 18-month mean PM10 and PM2.5 mass concentrations ranged from 15.4 μg/m3 in Helsinki to 56.7 μg/m3 in Athens and from 9.0 μg/m3 in Helsinki to 25.0 μg/m3 in Athens, respectively. Particle number concentrations ranged from 10,091 part/cm3 in Helsinki to 24,180 part/cm3 in Athens with highest levels being measured in winter. Fine particles accounted for more than 60% of PM10 with the exception of Athens where PM2.5 comprised 43% of PM10. Higher PM mass and number concentrations were measured in winter as compared to summer in all urban areas at a significance level p < 0.05.

Conclusions

Significant quantitative and qualitative differences for particle mass across the four urban areas in Europe were observed. These were due to strong local and regional characteristics of particulate pollution sources which contribute to the heterogeneity of health responses. In addition, these findings also bear on the ability of different countries to comply with existing directives and the effectiveness of mitigation policies.

Keywords

Particulate matterUltrafineCoarse particlesAbsorbanceUrbanRoad dustTraffic

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Lianou
    • 1
  • Marie-Cecile Chalbot
    • 1
  • Ilias G. Kavouras
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anastasia Kotronarou
    • 1
  • Anna Karakatsani
    • 3
  • Antonis Analytis
    • 3
  • Klea Katsouyanni
    • 3
  • Arto Puustinen
    • 4
  • Kaarle Hameri
    • 5
  • Marko Vallius
    • 6
  • Juha Pekkanen
    • 7
  • Claire Meddings
    • 8
  • Roy M. Harrison
    • 8
  • Jon G. Ayres
    • 9
  • Harry ten Brick
    • 10
  • Gerard Kos
    • 10
  • Kees Meliefste
    • 11
  • Jeroen de Hartog
    • 11
  • Gerard Hoek
    • 11
  1. 1.Institute for Environmental Research and Sustainable DevelopmentNational Observatory of AthensAthensGreece
  2. 2.ELFE Unite MixteINED/INSERMParis Cedex 20France
  3. 3.National Kapodistrian University of Athens Medical SchoolAthensGreece
  4. 4.Finnish Institute of Occupational HealthHelsinkiFinland
  5. 5.Department of PhysicsUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  6. 6.University of Eastern FinlandKuopioFinland
  7. 7.Department of Environmental HealthNational Institute for Health and Welfare (THL)KuopioFinland
  8. 8.Division of Environmental Health and Risk ManagementUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK
  9. 9.Institute of Occupational and Environmental MedicineUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK
  10. 10.Energy Research Center of The NetherlandsPettenThe Netherlands
  11. 11.Institute for Risk Assessment SciencesUtrecht UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands