Sleep and Breathing

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 59–68

Sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing in truck drivers

Risk analysis of road accidents

Authors

    • Department of Sensory Organs–OtorhinolaryngologyUniversity of Porto Medical School
    • Hospital São João–Serviço de Otorrinolaringologia, Alameda Professor Hernâni Monteiro
  • Jorge Spratley
    • Department of Sensory Organs–OtorhinolaryngologyUniversity of Porto Medical School
  • Isabel Catarino
    • Department of Sensory Organs–OtorhinolaryngologyUniversity of Porto Medical School
  • Nuno Lunet
    • Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Predictive Medicine and Pubic HealthUniversity of Porto Medical School
  • Manuel Pais-Clemente
    • Department of Sensory Organs–OtorhinolaryngologyUniversity of Porto Medical School
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11325-013-0848-x

Cite this article as:
Catarino, R., Spratley, J., Catarino, I. et al. Sleep Breath (2014) 18: 59. doi:10.1007/s11325-013-0848-x

Abstract

Background

Portugal has one of the highest road traffic fatality rates in Europe. A clear association between sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and traffic accidents has been previously demonstrated. This study aimed to determine prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and other sleep disorder symptoms among truck drivers and to identify which individual traits and work habits are associated to increased sleepiness and accident risk.

Methods

We evaluated a sample of 714 truck drivers using a questionnaire (244 face-to-face interviews, 470 self-administered) that included sociodemographic data, personal habits, previous accidents, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Berlin questionnaire (BQ).

Results

Twenty percent of drivers had EDS and 29 % were at high risk for having obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Two hundred sixty-one drivers (36.6 %) reported near-miss accidents (42.5 % sleep related) and 264 (37.0 %), a driving accident (16.3 % sleep related). ESS score ≥11 was a risk factor for both near-miss accidents (odds ratio (OR) = 3.84, p < 0.01) and accidents (OR = 2.25, p < 0.01). Antidepressant use was related to accidents (OR = 3.30, p = 0.03). We found an association between high Mallampati score (III–IV) and near misses (OR = 1.89, p = 0.04).

Conclusion

In this sample of Portuguese truck drivers, we observed a high prevalence of EDS and other sleep disorder symptoms. Accident risk was related to sleepiness and antidepressant use. Identifying drivers at risk for OSAS should be a major priority of medical assessment centers, as a public safety policy.

Keywords

AccidentsAntidepressantsSleepinessTruck drivers

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013