Research Article

Molecular Imaging and Biology

, Volume 13, Issue 5, pp 886-897

Saposin C Coupled Lipid Nanovesicles Enable Cancer-Selective Optical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  • Vinod KaimalAffiliated withBiomedical Engineering, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of CincinnatiNeuroimaging Research Consortium, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of CincinnatiCharles River Discovery and Imaging Services
  • , Zhengtao ChuAffiliated withDivision and Program in Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati
  • , Yonatan Y. MahllerAffiliated withHematology/Oncology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati
  • , Brigitte Papahadjopoulos-SternbergAffiliated withNanoAnalytical Laboratory
  • , Timothy P. CripeAffiliated withHematology/Oncology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati
  • , Scott K. HollandAffiliated withBiomedical Engineering, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of CincinnatiNeuroimaging Research Consortium, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati
  • , Xiaoyang QiAffiliated withDivision and Program in Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati Email author 

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Abstract

Purpose

Nanovesicles composed of the phospholipid dioleylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) and a fusogenic protein, saposin C (SapC), selectively target and induce apoptotic cell death in a variety of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We tested whether such tumor-homing nanovesicles are capable of delivering fluorescent probes and magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents to cancerous tissue to aid in earlier detection and improve visualization.

Procedures

SapC–DOPS nanovesicles labeled with either a far-red fluorescent probe (CellVue® Maroon, CVM) or conjugated with a dextran coated MR contrast agent, ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO), were systemically administrated into xenografts for tumor detection using optical and MR imaging systems.

Results

SapC–DOPS nanovesicles were effectively detected in vivo in tumor-bearing animals using both optical and MR imaging techniques, thereby demonstrating the cancer-selective properties of these nanovesicles.

Conclusions

SapC–DOPS nanovesicles offer promise as a new and robust theranostic agent for broad cancer-selective detection, visualization, and potential therapy.

Key Words

Saposin C–dioleylphosphatidylserine nanovesicles USPIO Fluorescence Cancer-selective detection