Molecular Imaging and Biology

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 325–334

Antioxidants Improve Early Survival of Cardiomyoblasts After Transplantation to the Myocardium

Authors

    • Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal MedicineMayo Clinic College of Medicine
  • Olivier Gheysens
    • Department of Nuclear MedicineUniversity Hospital Leuven
  • Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    • Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear MedicineStanford University
  • Ian Y. Chen
    • Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear MedicineStanford University
    • Department of BioengineeringStanford University
  • Karen M. Peterson
    • Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal MedicineMayo Clinic College of Medicine
  • Jürgen K. Willmann
    • Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear MedicineStanford University
  • Joseph C. Wu
    • Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear MedicineStanford University
  • Xiangyang Zhu
    • Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Internal MedicineMayo Clinic College of Medicine
  • Lilach O. Lerman
    • Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Internal MedicineMayo Clinic College of Medicine
  • Sanjiv S. Gambhir
    • Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear MedicineStanford University
    • Department of BioengineeringStanford University
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11307-009-0274-4

Cite this article as:
Rodriguez-Porcel, M., Gheysens, O., Paulmurugan, R. et al. Mol Imaging Biol (2010) 12: 325. doi:10.1007/s11307-009-0274-4

Abstract

Purpose

We tested the hypothesis that modulation of the microenvironment (using antioxidants) will increase stem cell survival in hypoxia and after transplantation to the myocardium.

Procedures

Rat cardiomyoblasts were stably transfected with a reporter gene (firefly luciferase) for bioluminescence imaging (BLI). First, we examined the role of oxidative stress in cells under hypoxic conditions. Subsequently, stem cells were transplanted to the myocardium of rats using high-resolution ultrasound, and their survival was monitored daily using BLI.

Results

Under hypoxia, oxidative stress was increased together with decreased cell survival compared to control cells, both of which were preserved by antioxidants. In living subjects, oxidative stress blockade increased early cell survival after transplantation to the myocardium, compared to untreated cells/animals.

Conclusion

Modulation of the local microenvironment (with antioxidants) improves stem cell survival. Increased understanding of the interaction between stem cells and their microenvironment will be critical to advance the field of regenerative medicine.

Key words

Bioluminescence Firefly luciferase Myoblasts Molecular imaging Stem cell Oxidative stress Myocardium Antioxidants

Copyright information

© Academy of Molecular Imaging 2009