Ecological Research

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 793–807

Bacterial succession during 500 years of soil development under agricultural use

  • Jun Cui
  • Han Meng
  • Ming Nie
  • Xueping Chen
  • Zhaolei Li
  • Naishun Bu
  • Bo Li
  • Jiakuan Chen
  • Zhexue Quan
  • Changming Fang
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11284-012-0955-3

Cite this article as:
Cui, J., Meng, H., Nie, M. et al. Ecol Res (2012) 27: 793. doi:10.1007/s11284-012-0955-3

Abstract

Soil bacterial succession under intensive anthropogenic disturbances is not well known. Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms and 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, this study investigated how soil bacterial diversity and community structure changed under two agricultural land uses (paddy rice and upland cropping) in relation to soil development along a 500-year chronosequence created by intermittent reclamation of estuarine salt marshes. Multivariate analysis revealed orderly changes in soil physicochemical properties and bacterial community structure with time, confirming the occurrence of soil development and bacterial succession. Patterns of soil development and bacterial succession resembled each other, with recent land uses affecting their trajectories but not the overall direction. Succession of bacterial community structure was mainly associated with changes in α-Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. Two stages of bacterial succession were observed, a dramatic-succession stage during the first several decades when bacterial diversity increased evidently and bacterial community structure changed rapidly, and a long gradual-succession stage that lasted for centuries. Canonical correspondence analysis identified soil Na+, potentially mineralizable nitrogen, total phosphorous, and crystallinity of iron oxyhydrates as potential environmental drivers of bacterial succession. To conclude, orderly succession of soil bacterial communities occurred along with the long-term development of agroecosystems, which in turn was associated with soil physicochemical changes over time.

Keywords

Pyrosequencing T-RFLP 16S rRNA gene Salt marsh reclamation Chronosequence Yangtze Estuary 

Supplementary material

11284_2012_955_MOESM1_ESM.rar (433 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (RAR 432 kb)

Copyright information

© The Ecological Society of Japan 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jun Cui
    • 1
  • Han Meng
    • 2
  • Ming Nie
    • 1
  • Xueping Chen
    • 1
  • Zhaolei Li
    • 1
  • Naishun Bu
    • 1
  • Bo Li
    • 1
  • Jiakuan Chen
    • 1
  • Zhexue Quan
    • 2
  • Changming Fang
    • 1
  1. 1.Coastal Ecosystems Research Station of Yangtze River Estuary, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Biodiversity and Ecological Engineering, Institute of Biodiversity ScienceFudan UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and Microbial Engineering, School of Life SciencesFudan UniversityShanghaiChina