Ecological Research

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 372–381

Degradation of longicorn beetle (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Disteniidae) fauna caused by conversion from broad-leaved to man-made conifer stands of Cryptomeria japonica (Taxodiaceae) in central Japan

  • Shun’ichi Makino
  • Hideaki Goto
  • Motohiro Hasegawa
  • Kimiko Okabe
  • Hiroshi Tanaka
  • Takenari Inoue
  • Isamu Okochi
Special Feature Sustainability and biodiversity of forest ecosystems: an interdisciplinary approach

DOI: 10.1007/s11284-007-0359-y

Cite this article as:
Makino, S., Goto, H., Hasegawa, M. et al. Ecol Res (2007) 22: 372. doi:10.1007/s11284-007-0359-y

Abstract

We studied the species richness and assemblages of longicorn beetles (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Disteniidae) in ten secondary broad-leaved stands and eight plantation stands of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) of various ages after clear-cutting or plantation in Ibaraki, central Japan. The species richness of longicorns, which were collected with Malaise traps, was the highest in young stands, decreasing with the age of the stand for both broad-leaved and conifer stands. A canonical correspondence analysis divided the 18 plots into three groups based on longicorn assemblages and environmental variables. These three groups consisted of (1) very young (1–4 years old) stands after clear-cutting or plantation; (2) 12- to over 100 year-old broad-leaved stands; (3) 7- to 76-year-old conifer stands. The species richness of the longicorns was the highest in the young stands followed, in order of decreasing species richness, by broad-leaved stands and conifer stands. Possible causes of the high species richness in young stands include large amounts of coarse wood debris and flowers, which are resources for oviposition and nutrition for adults, respectively. The lower longicorn diversity in conifer stands than in broad-leaved stands may be due to the lower diversity of trees available as host plants in the former. Almost all species that occurred in conifer stands were also collected in young and/or broad-leaved stands, but the reverse was not true, suggesting that conifer plantations cannot replace broad-leaved stands in terms of longicorn biodiversity. We argue that an extensive conversion of broad-leaved forests into conifer plantations will lead to an impoverishment of the longicorn fauna, which may result in the degradation of ecosystem functions possibly carried out by them.

Keywords

Biodiversity Chronosequence Forest Insect Plantation 

Copyright information

© The Ecological Society of Japan 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shun’ichi Makino
    • 1
  • Hideaki Goto
    • 1
  • Motohiro Hasegawa
    • 1
  • Kimiko Okabe
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Tanaka
    • 1
  • Takenari Inoue
    • 1
  • Isamu Okochi
    • 1
  1. 1.Forestry and Forest Products Research InstituteTsukubaJapan

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