World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 205–213

Soil bacterial community composition and diversity respond to cultivation in Karst ecosystems

  • Xiangbi Chen
  • Yirong Su
  • Xunyang He
  • Yawei Wei
  • Wenxue Wei
  • Jinshui Wu
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11274-011-0809-0

Cite this article as:
Chen, X., Su, Y., He, X. et al. World J Microbiol Biotechnol (2012) 28: 205. doi:10.1007/s11274-011-0809-0

Abstract

Soil microorganisms play vital roles in recovering and maintaining the health of ecosystems, particularly in fragile Karst ecosystems that are easily degraded after cultivation. We investigated the composition and diversity of soil bacterial communities, based on RFLP and 16S rDNA sequencing, in a cropland, a naturally revegetated land with former cultivation disturbance and a primeval forest in the subtropical Karst of southwest China. Our results illustrated that Proteobacteria accounted for 44.8% of the 600 tested clones, making it the most dominant phylum observed. This phylum was followed by Acidobacteria and Planctomycetes for the three Karst soils analyzed. Compared with the primeval forest soil, the proportions of Proteobacteria were decreased by 30.2 and 37.9%, while Acidobacteria increased by 93.9 and 87.9%, and the Shannon-Wiener diversity indices and the physicochemical parameters declined in the cropland and the revegetated land, respectively. Among the three soils, the proportion of dominant bacterial phyla and the diversity indices in the revegetated land were similar to the cropland, implying the bacterial community in the cropland was relatively stable, and the after-effects of cultivation were difficult to eliminate. However, similar distributions of the four Proteobacteria subphyla were observed between the revegetated land and the primeval forest soil. Furthermore, the proportion of Rhizobiales belonging to α-Proteobacteria was sharply decreased with cultivation compared to the primeval forest soil, while a small cluster of Rhizobiales recurred with vegetation recovery. These results indicated that although the subphyla of the dominant bacterial phylum had some positive responses to 20 years of vegetation recovery, it is a slow process. Our results suggest that priority should be given to conserve the primeval forest and inoculation of functional microorganisms on the basis of vegetation recovery may be more effective for the restoration of Karst ecosystems after cultivation.

Keywords

Karst Cultivation Bacterial community 16S rDNA 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiangbi Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yirong Su
    • 1
    • 3
  • Xunyang He
    • 1
    • 3
  • Yawei Wei
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Wenxue Wei
    • 1
  • Jinshui Wu
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical RegionInstitute of Subtropical Agriculture, The Chinese Academy of SciencesChangshaPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Huanjiang Observation and Research Station for Karst Eco-systemsThe Chinese Academy of SciencesHuanjiangPeople’s Republic of China

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