World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 25, Issue 9, pp 1519–1528

Autochthonous bioaugmentation and its possible application to oil spills

  • Reia Hosokawa
  • Motonori Nagai
  • Masaaki Morikawa
  • Hidetoshi Okuyama
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s11274-009-0044-0

Cite this article as:
Hosokawa, R., Nagai, M., Morikawa, M. et al. World J Microbiol Biotechnol (2009) 25: 1519. doi:10.1007/s11274-009-0044-0

Abstract

Bioaugmentation for oil spills is a much more promising technique than is biostimulation. However, the effectiveness of bioaugmentation is variable, because the survival and the xenobiotic-degrading ability of introduced microorganisms are highly dependent on environmental conditions. As an alternative, autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA) is proposed to overcome these difficulties. The ABA method is like a ready-made bioaugmentation technology. In ABA, microorganisms indigenous to the contaminated site or predicted contamination site that are well-characterized and potentially capable of degrading oils are used, and these microorganisms should be enriched under conditions where bioaugmentation will be conducted. It is possible to obtain information in advance on the chemical and physical characteristics of potential oil spill sites and of oils that might be spilled. The application of ABA in the coastal areas of Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan, is considered here, because Hokkaido is located south of Sakhalin Island, Russia, where development of oil fields is in progress. If oil spills in this region were well characterized in advance, ABA could be a feasible technology in the near future.

Keywords

Autochthonous bioaugmentationBioremediationEnrichment cultivationOil spillReinoculationSakhalin oil field

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reia Hosokawa
    • 1
  • Motonori Nagai
    • 1
  • Masaaki Morikawa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hidetoshi Okuyama
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Course in Environmental Molecular Biology and Microbial Ecology, Division of Biosphere Science, Graduate School of Environmental ScienceHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan
  2. 2.Laboratory of Environmental Molecular Biology, Faculty of Environmental Earth ScienceHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan