Wetlands Ecology and Management

, Volume 19, Issue 2, pp 141–157

Mapping changes in tidal wetland vegetation composition and pattern across a salinity gradient using high spatial resolution imagery

  • Karin Tuxen
  • Lisa Schile
  • Diana Stralberg
  • Stuart Siegel
  • Tom Parker
  • Michael Vasey
  • John Callaway
  • Maggi Kelly
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11273-010-9207-x

Cite this article as:
Tuxen, K., Schile, L., Stralberg, D. et al. Wetlands Ecol Manage (2011) 19: 141. doi:10.1007/s11273-010-9207-x

Abstract

Detailed vegetation mapping of wetlands, both natural and restored, can offer valuable information about vegetation diversity and community structure and provides the means for examining vegetation change over time. We mapped vegetation at six tidal marshes (two natural, four restored) in the San Francisco Estuary, CA, USA, between 2003 and 2004 using detailed vegetation field surveys and high spatial-resolution color-infrared aerial photography. Vegetation classes were determined by performing hierarchical agglomerative clustering on the field data collected from each tidal marsh. Supervised classification of the CIR photography resulted in vegetation class mapping accuracies ranging from 70 to 92%; 10 out of 12 classification accuracies were above 80%, demonstrating the potential to map emergent wetland vegetation. The number of vegetation classes decreased with salinity, and increased with size and age. In general, landscape diversity, as measured by the Shannon’s diversity index, also decreased with salinity, with an exception for the most saline site, a newly restored marsh. Vegetation change between years is evident, but the differences across sites in composition and pattern were larger than change within sites over two growing seasons.

Keywords

Remote sensingColor infrared aerial photographySan Francisco Bay

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karin Tuxen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lisa Schile
    • 1
    • 5
  • Diana Stralberg
    • 3
  • Stuart Siegel
    • 4
  • Tom Parker
    • 5
  • Michael Vasey
    • 5
  • John Callaway
    • 6
  • Maggi Kelly
    • 1
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and ManagementUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Google IncMountain ViewUSA
  3. 3.PRBO Conservation SciencePetalumaUSA
  4. 4.Wetlands and Water Resources, IncSan RafaelUSA
  5. 5.Department of BiologySan Francisco State UniversitySan FranciscoUSA
  6. 6.Department of Environmental SciencesUniversity of San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  7. 7.Geospatial Innovation FacilityUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA