Article

Water Resources Management

, Volume 25, Issue 15, pp 3977-3992

First online:

Sustainable Catchment Managing in a Climate Changing World: New Integrative Modalities for Connecting Policy Makers, Scientists and Other Stakeholders

  • Ray IsonAffiliated withSchool of Geography and Environmental Science, Monash UniversityCommunication & Systems Department, The Open University Email author 
  • , Kevin CollinsAffiliated withOpen Systems Research Group, Communication & Systems Department, The Open University
  • , John ColvinAffiliated withOpen Systems Research Group, Communication & Systems Department, The Open University
  • , Janice JigginsAffiliated withCommunication & Innovation Studies Group, Wageningen University
  • , Pier Paolo RoggeroAffiliated withDipartimento di Scienze Agronomiche e Genetica Vegetale Agraria and NRD Desertification Research Group, University of Sassari
  • , Giovanna SeddaiuAffiliated withDipartimento di Scienze Agronomiche e Genetica Vegetale Agraria and NRD Desertification Research Group, University of Sassari
  • , Patrick SteyaertAffiliated withINRA-SAD, UR SenS, Université Paris-Est, Marne la Vallée
  • , Marco ToderiAffiliated withDipartimento di Scienze Ambientali e delle Produzioni Vegetali, UNIVPM (Polytechnic University of Marche)
  • , Chiara ZanollaAffiliated withNRD Desertification Research Group, University of Sassari

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Abstract

This paper characterises some of the main issues confronting water-catchment managing in a climate-changing world and addresses wide-spread concerns about the lack of connectivity between science, policy making and implementation. The paper’s arguments are ‘framed’ within a paradigm of systemic and adaptive governing, regulating, planning and managing understood as a nested systemic hierarchy. It is argued that climate change adaptation is best understood as a coevolutionary dynamic, principally, but not exclusively between human beings and the biophysical world. Two forms of ‘knowledge brokerage’ based on mode 1 (knowledge) and mode 2 (knowing) are distinguished with practical implications. Drawing on extensive research by the authors, eight modalities for enacting ‘knowledge brokerage’ are introduced. The conditions for or against success in employing these modalities are described. Consistent with the views of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 4th Report 2007, it is argued that water managing is a paradigmatic domain for making climate change adaptation ‘real’ and a systemic issue of global concern at the core of sustainable development.

Keywords

Water governance Catchment managing Watershed managing Knowledge management Social-ecological thinking Dualism Duality