Veterinary Research Communications

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 109–114

Efficacy of ‘indigenous vaccine’ using native ‘Indian bison type’ genotype of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis for the control of clinical Johne’s disease in an organized goat herd

Authors

    • College of Veterinary Science & Animal HusbandrySardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University
  • B. S. Chandel
    • College of Veterinary Science & Animal HusbandrySardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University
  • H. C. Chauhan
    • College of Veterinary Science & Animal HusbandrySardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University
  • A. Dadawala
    • College of Veterinary Science & Animal HusbandrySardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University
  • S. V. Singh
    • Central Institute for Research on Goats, Makhdoom, PO-Farah
  • P. K. Singh
    • Central Institute for Research on Goats, Makhdoom, PO-Farah
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11259-013-9551-4

Cite this article as:
Singh, K., Chandel, B.S., Chauhan, H.C. et al. Vet Res Commun (2013) 37: 109. doi:10.1007/s11259-013-9551-4

Abstract

Therapeutic efficacy of a new ‘Indigenous vaccine’ prepared from native highly pathogenic ‘Indian Bison Type’ genotype of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) of goat origin has been evaluated with respect to control of clinical Johne’s disease in naturally infected Mehsana breed of goat in North Gujarat. Fifty goats from Sheep and Goats Research Station, Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar, were randomly divided into 2 groups viz.,‘Vaccinated’(n = 35) and ‘Control’(n = 15). After vaccination, goats were monitored for physical condition, morbidity, mortality, body weights, shedding of MAP in feces, internal condition, gross lesions and humoral immune responses up to 120 days (at each interval of 30 days). At the end of 120 days trial, there was marked overall improvement in physical condition and body weights of vaccinated goats as compared to ‘Control’ goats. Vaccinated goats gained significantly (P < 0.05) higher body weights, hardly exhibited any lesions characteristic of JD, had significantly higher (P < 0.01) antibody titers and shedding of MAP was significantly (P < 0.01) reduced. Few of the vaccinated goats were positive for MAP DNA in faecal PCR and blood PCR before vaccination. However, all were found as negative at 120 days post vaccination (DPV). Overall vaccine exhibited effective in restriction of MAP infection and significant improvement in production parameters and reduction in mortality and morbidity due to JD. The trial in the herd will be continued.

Keywords

Johne’s diseaseMycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosisVaccinationMehsana goat

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013